Plant Ecology

, Volume 213, Issue 11, pp 1781–1792

Micro-evolutionary patterns of juvenile wood density in a pine species

Authors

  • Jean-Baptiste Lamy
    • INRA, UMR 1202 BIOGECO
    • Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1202 BIOGECO
    • INRA, UMR 547 PIAFUniversity of Blaise Pascal
  • Frédéric Lagane
    • INRA, UMR 1202 BIOGECO
    • Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1202 BIOGECO
  • Christophe Plomion
    • INRA, UMR 1202 BIOGECO
    • Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1202 BIOGECO
  • Hervé Cochard
    • INRA, UMR 547 PIAFUniversity of Blaise Pascal
    • INRA, UMR 1202 BIOGECO
    • Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1202 BIOGECO
    • Department of Agriculture, Food & Natural ResourcesUniversity of Sydney
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11258-012-0133-2

Cite this article as:
Lamy, J., Lagane, F., Plomion, C. et al. Plant Ecol (2012) 213: 1781. doi:10.1007/s11258-012-0133-2

Abstract

Wood density can be considered an adaptive trait, because it ensures the safe and efficient transport of water from the roots to the leaves, mechanical support for the body of the plant and the storage of biological chemicals. Its variability has been extensively described in narrow genetic backgrounds and in wide ranges of forest tree species, but little is known about the extent of natural genetic and phenotypic variability within species. This information is essential to our understanding of the evolutionary forces that have shaped this trait, and for the evaluation of its inclusion in breeding programs. We assessed juvenile wood density, leaf area, total aboveground biomass, and growth in six Pinus pinaster populations of different geographic origins (France, Spain, and Morocco) growing in a provenance-progeny trial. No genetic differentiation was found for wood density, whereas all other traits significantly differed between populations. Heritability of this trait was moderate, with a low additive genetic variance. For retrospective identification of the evolutionary forces acting on juvenile wood density, we compared the distribution of neutral markers (FST) and quantitative genetic differentiation (QST). We found that QST was significantly lower than FST, suggesting evolutionary stasis. Furthermore, we did not detect any relationship between juvenile wood density and drought tolerance (resistance to cavitation), suggesting that this trait could not be used as a proxy for drought tolerance at the intraspecific level.

Keywords

CanalizationHeritabilityQST/FST comparisonPineEvolutionary stasisJuvenile wood density

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012