Plant Ecology

, Volume 184, Issue 1, pp 13–25

Alpine vascular plant species richness: the importance of daily maximum temperature and pH

  • C.M. Vonlanthen
  • P.M. Kammer
  • W. Eugster
  • A. Bühler
  • H. Veit
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11258-005-9048-5

Cite this article as:
Vonlanthen, C., Kammer, P., Eugster, W. et al. Plant Ecol (2006) 184: 13. doi:10.1007/s11258-005-9048-5

Abstract

Species richness in the alpine zone varies dramatically when communities are compared. We explored (i) which stress and disturbance factors were highly correlated with species richness, (ii) whether the intermediate stress hypothesis (ISH) and the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH) can be applied to alpine ecosystems, and (iii) whether standing crop can be used as an easily measurable surrogate for causal factors determining species richness in the alpine zone. Species numbers and standing crop were determined in 14 alpine plant communities in the Swiss Alps. To quantify the stress and disturbance factors in each community, air temperature, relative air humidity, wind speed, global radiation, UV-B radiation, length of the growing season, soil suction, pH, main soil nutrients, waterlogging, soil movement, number of avalanches, level of denudation, winter dieback, herbivory, wind damage, and days with frost were measured or observed. The present study revealed that 82% of the variance in␣vascular species richness among sites could be explained by just two abiotic factors, daily maximum temperature and soil pH. Daily maximum temperature and pH affect species richness both directly and via their effects on other environmental variables. Some stress and disturbance factors were related to species richness in a monotonic way, others in an unimodal way. Monotonic relationships suggest that the harsher the environment is, the fewer species can survive in such habitats. In cases of unimodal relationships (ISH and IDH) species richness decreases at both ends of the gradients due to the harsh environment and/or the interaction of other environmental factors. Competition and disturbance seemed only to play a secondary role in the form of fine-tuning species richness in specific communities. Thus, we concluded that neither the ISH nor the IDH can be considered useful conceptual models for the alpine zone.

Furthermore, we found that standing crop can be used as an easily measurable surrogate for causal factors determining species richness in the alpine zone, even though there is no direct causality.

Key words

Alpine vegetationIntermediate disturbance hypothesisIntermediate stress hypothesisMicroclimateSoil nutrientsStanding crop

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • C.M. Vonlanthen
    • 1
  • P.M. Kammer
    • 2
  • W. Eugster
    • 3
  • A. Bühler
    • 1
  • H. Veit
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of GeographyUniversity of BerneBerneSwitzerland
  2. 2.LLB S1 BiologyCanton and University of BerneBerneSwitzerland
  3. 3.Institute of Plant SciencesZürichSwitzerland