User Modeling and User-Adapted Interaction

, Volume 23, Issue 5, pp 447–488

Recommending people to people: the nature of reciprocal recommenders with a case study in online dating

Authors

    • Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI), School of Information TechnologiesUniversity of Sydney
  • Tomasz Rej
    • Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI), School of Information TechnologiesUniversity of Sydney
  • Joshua Akehurst
    • Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI), School of Information TechnologiesUniversity of Sydney
  • Irena Koprinska
    • Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI), School of Information TechnologiesUniversity of Sydney
  • Kalina Yacef
    • Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI), School of Information TechnologiesUniversity of Sydney
  • Judy Kay
    • Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI), School of Information TechnologiesUniversity of Sydney
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11257-012-9125-0

Cite this article as:
Pizzato, L., Rej, T., Akehurst, J. et al. User Model User-Adap Inter (2013) 23: 447. doi:10.1007/s11257-012-9125-0

Abstract

People-to-people recommenders constitute an important class of recommender systems. Examples include online dating, where people have the common goal of finding a partner, and employment websites where one group of users needs to find a job (employer) and another group needs to find an employee. People-to-people recommenders differ from the traditional items-to-people recommenders as they must satisfy both parties; we call this type of recommender reciprocal. This article is the first to present a comprehensive view of this important recommender class. We first identify the characteristics of reciprocal recommenders and compare them with traditional recommenders, which are widely used in e-commerce websites. We then present a series of studies and evaluations of a content-based reciprocal recommender in the domain of online dating. It uses a large dataset from a major online dating website. We use this case study to illustrate the distinctive requirements of reciprocal recommenders and highlight important challenges, such as the need to avoid bad recommendations since they may make users to feel rejected. Our experiments indicate that, by considering reciprocity, the rate of successful connections can be significantly improved. They also show that, despite the existence of rich explicit profiles, the use of implicit profiles provides more effective recommendations. We conclude with a discussion, linking our work in online dating to the many other domains that require reciprocal recommenders. Our key contributions are the recognition of the reciprocal recommender as an important class of recommender, the identification of its distinctive characteristics and the exploration of how these impact the recommendation process in an extensive case study in the domain of online dating.

Keywords

Recommender systemsOnline datingReciprocity
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012