Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 44, Supplement 1, pp 11–16

Prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in dairy cattle, cattle-keeping families, their non-cattle-keeping neighbours and HIV-positive individuals in Dagoretti Division, Nairobi, Kenya

Authors

  • Erastus Kange’the
    • Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of Nairobi
  • Brigid McDermott
    • Biometry Unit, Department of Crop ScienceUniversity of Nairobi
    • International Livestock Research Institute
  • Cecilia Mbae
    • Centre for Microbiological ResearchKenya Medical Research Institute
  • Erastus Mulinge
    • Centre for Microbiological ResearchKenya Medical Research Institute
  • Joseph Monda
    • Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of Nairobi
  • Concepta Nyongesa
    • Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of Nairobi
  • Julie Ambia
    • Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of Nairobi
  • Alice Njehu
    • Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of Nairobi
SI (Emerging Zoonoses)

DOI: 10.1007/s11250-012-0201-6

Cite this article as:
Kange’the, E., McDermott, B., Grace, D. et al. Trop Anim Health Prod (2012) 44: 11. doi:10.1007/s11250-012-0201-6

Abstract

This paper reports a study estimating the prevalence of cryptosporidiosis, an emerging zoonosis, in people and cattle in Dagoretti, Nairobi. A repeated cross-sectional survey was carried out among randomly selected cattle keepers in Dagoretti, their dairy cattle and their non-cattle-keeping neighbours in the dry and wet seasons of 2006. A survey was also carried out among a group of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Faecal samples were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts using the modified Ziehl–Neelsen method; 16 % of the samples were also examined using immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) technique. Quality control consisted of blind reviews of slides, examining split samples and confirming slide results with IFA. We found that members of dairy households had a dry season cryptosporidiosis prevalence of 4 % and wet season prevalence of 0.3 %, and non-dairy households, a prevalence of 5 and 0 %, respectively. The cattle dry season prevalence was 15 %, and the wet season prevalence, 11 %. The prevalence in people living with HIV was 5 %. The laboratory quality control system showed some inconsistency within and between different tests, indicating challenges in obtaining consistent results under difficult field and working conditions. In conclusion, this is the first reported study to simultaneously survey livestock, livestock keepers and their neighbours for cryptosporidiosis. We failed to find evidence that zoonotic cryptosporidiosis is important overall in this community. This study also draws attention to the importance of quality control and its reporting in surveys in developing countries.

Keywords

CryptosporidiosisDairy cattleNairobiHIV

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012