Social Psychology of Education

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 1–23

What behaviours do students consider academically dishonest? Findings from a survey of Canadian undergraduate students

Authors

    • Department of Sociology and Social Studies, Faculty of ArtsThe University of Regina
  • H. Sam Hage
    • Department of Sociology and Social Studies, Faculty of ArtsThe University of Regina
  • Henry P. H. Chow
    • Department of Sociology and Social Studies, Faculty of ArtsThe University of Regina
    • University of Calgary
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11218-011-9166-y

Cite this article as:
Jurdi, R., Hage, H.S. & Chow, H.P.H. Soc Psychol Educ (2012) 15: 1. doi:10.1007/s11218-011-9166-y

Abstract

This paper identifies those behaviours that students perceive to be academically dishonest and sheds light on several demographic, academic and situational factors that predict students’ perceptions of academic dishonesty. Data for this investigation were obtained through self-administered questionnaires from a sample of 321 undergraduate students attending university in a western Canadian city during the academic year 2007–2008. There was a high extent of leniency in students’ definitions of what behaviours constitute academic dishonesty, particularly for situations involving plagiarism and helping somebody else cheat. Sex, importance of academic ethic, strength of academic ability, deep learning strategy, and frequency of witnessing peers cheat made unique contributions to the prediction of students’ perceptions of dishonesty. Implications of these findings for institutional interventions are discussed.

Keywords

Academic dishonestyPerceptionsDeterminantsUndergraduate studentsWestern Canada

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011