Space Science Reviews

, Volume 194, Issue 1, pp 1–96

Energetic Particle Influence on the Earth’s Atmosphere

  • Irina A. Mironova
  • Karen L. Aplin
  • Frank Arnold
  • Galina A. Bazilevskaya
  • R. Giles Harrison
  • Alexei A. Krivolutsky
  • Keri A. Nicoll
  • Eugene V. Rozanov
  • Esa Turunen
  • Ilya G. Usoskin
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11214-015-0185-4

Cite this article as:
Mironova, I.A., Aplin, K.L., Arnold, F. et al. Space Sci Rev (2015) 194: 1. doi:10.1007/s11214-015-0185-4

Abstract

This manuscript gives an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the effects of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) onto the whole atmosphere, from the lower thermosphere/mesosphere through the stratosphere and troposphere, to the surface. The paper summarizes the different sources and energies of particles, principally galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), solar energetic particles (SEPs) and energetic electron precipitation (EEP). All the proposed mechanisms by which EPP can affect the atmosphere are discussed, including chemical changes in the upper atmosphere and lower thermosphere, chemistry-dynamics feedbacks, the global electric circuit and cloud formation. The role of energetic particles in Earth’s atmosphere is a multi-disciplinary problem that requires expertise from a range of scientific backgrounds. To assist with this synergy, summary tables are provided, which are intended to evaluate the level of current knowledge of the effects of energetic particles on processes in the entire atmosphere.

Keywords

Energetic Particle Precipitation (EPP)Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs)Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs)Energetic Electron Precipitation (EEP)IonsThe Earth Atmosphere: Lower Thermosphere, Mesosphere, Stratosphere, TroposphereAtmospheric ProcessesAtmospheric ChemistryGlobal Electric CircuitAerosols and CloudsClimate
ACR

anomalous cosmic ray

CR

cosmic ray

CRAC

cosmic ray atmospheric cascade

CME

coronal mass ejection

CRII

cosmic rays induced ionization

CIR

corotating interaction region

CCN

cloud condensation nuclei

CCM

chemistry climate model

CGL

corrected geomagnetic latitude

EAS

extensive air showers

EPP

energetic particle precipitation

EPPs

energetic precipitating particles

EP

energetic particle

EEP

energetic electron precipitation

EMIC

electromagnetic ion cyclotron

EUV

extreme ultraviolet

GCR

galactic cosmic ray

GLE

ground level enhancement

GMIR

global merged interaction region

GEC

global electrical circuit

HCS

heliospheric current sheet

IMF

interplanetary magnetic field

NM

neutron monitor

NLC

noctilucent clouds

PSC

Polar stratospheric clouds

REP

relativistic electron precipitation

SA

solar activity

SCR

solar cosmic ray

SEP

solar energetic particle

SPE

solar proton event

(SEPs event ≡ SPE ≡ SCRs)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irina A. Mironova
    • 1
  • Karen L. Aplin
    • 2
  • Frank Arnold
    • 3
  • Galina A. Bazilevskaya
    • 4
  • R. Giles Harrison
    • 5
  • Alexei A. Krivolutsky
    • 6
  • Keri A. Nicoll
    • 5
  • Eugene V. Rozanov
    • 7
  • Esa Turunen
    • 8
  • Ilya G. Usoskin
    • 9
  1. 1.Earth Physics Department, Institute and Faculty of PhysicsSt. Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.Physics DepartmentUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  3. 3.Atmospheric Physics DivisionMax-Planck-Institute for Nuclear PhysicsHeidelbergGermany
  4. 4.Lebedev Physical InstituteRussian Academy of ScienceMoscowRussia
  5. 5.Department of MeteorologyUniversity of ReadingReading BerksUK
  6. 6.Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry and DynamicsCentral Aerological Observatory Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental MonitoringDolgoprudny, MoscowRussia
  7. 7.PMOD/WRC and IAC ETHZDavos DorfSwitzerland
  8. 8.Sodankylä Geophysical ObservatorySodankyläFinland
  9. 9.Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (Oulu unit) and ReSoLVE Centre of ExcellenceUniversity of OuluOuluFinland