Space Science Reviews

, Volume 150, Issue 1, pp 125–160

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment

Authors

    • Dept. of Earth and Space SciencesUniversity of California
  • M. C. Foote
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • B. T. Greenhagen
    • Dept. of Earth and Space SciencesUniversity of California
  • J. T. Schofield
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • S. Calcutt
    • Dept. of PhysicsUniversity of Oxford
  • A. R. Vasavada
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • D. J. Preston
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • F. W. Taylor
    • Dept. of PhysicsUniversity of Oxford
  • C. C. Allen
    • Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center
  • K. J. Snook
    • NASA Headquarters
  • B. M. Jakosky
    • Dept. of Geological SciencesUniversity of Colorado
  • B. C. Murray
    • Div. of Geological and Planetary SciencesCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • L. A. Soderblom
    • US Geologic Survey
  • B. Jau
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • S. Loring
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • J. Bulharowski
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • N. E. Bowles
    • Dept. of PhysicsUniversity of Oxford
  • I. R. Thomas
    • Dept. of PhysicsUniversity of Oxford
  • M. T. Sullivan
    • Dept. of Earth and Space SciencesUniversity of California
  • C. Avis
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • E. M. De Jong
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • W. Hartford
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
  • D. J. McCleese
    • Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
Open AccessArticle

DOI: 10.1007/s11214-009-9529-2

Cite this article as:
Paige, D.A., Foote, M.C., Greenhagen, B.T. et al. Space Sci Rev (2010) 150: 125. doi:10.1007/s11214-009-9529-2

Abstract

The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will be the first instrument to systematically map the global thermal state of the Moon and its diurnal and seasonal variability. Diviner will measure reflected solar and emitted infrared radiation in nine spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 0.3 to 400 microns. The resulting measurements will enable characterization of the lunar thermal environment, mapping surface properties such as thermal inertia, rock abundance and silicate mineralogy, and determination of the locations and temperatures of volatile cold traps in the lunar polar regions.

Keywords

MoonLunarDivinerThermalRadiometerMappingTemperatureInfraredMineralogyPetrologyLROReconnaissance Orbiter
Download to read the full article text

Copyright information

© The author(s) 2009