Space Science Reviews

, Volume 128, Issue 1, pp 745–801

Rosina – Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis

Authors

  • H. Balsiger
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • P. Bochsler
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • P. Eberhardt
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • J. Fischer
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • S. Graf
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • A. Jäckel
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • E. Kopp
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • U. Langer
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • M. Mildner
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • J. Müller
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • T. Riesen
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • M. Rubin
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • S. Scherer
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • P. Wurz
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • S. Wüthrich
    • Physikalisches InstitutUniversität Bern
  • E. Arijs
    • Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
  • S. Delanoye
    • Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
  • J. De Keyser
    • Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
  • E. Neefs
    • Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
  • D. Nevejans
    • Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
  • H. Rème
    • CESR
  • C. Aoustin
    • CESR
  • C. Mazelle
    • CESR
  • J.-L. Médale
    • CESR
  • J. A. Sauvaud
    • CESR
  • J.-J. Berthelier
    • IPSL
  • J.-L. Bertaux
    • IPSL
  • L. Duvet
    • IPSL
  • J.-M. Illiano
    • IPSL
  • S. A. Fuselier
    • Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center
  • A. G. Ghielmetti
    • Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center
  • T. Magoncelli
    • Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center
  • E. G. Shelley
    • Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center
  • A. Korth
    • MPI für Sonnensystemforschung
  • K. Heerlein
    • MPI für Sonnensystemforschung
  • H. Lauche
    • MPI für Sonnensystemforschung
  • S. Livi
    • MPI für Sonnensystemforschung
  • A. Loose
    • MPI für Sonnensystemforschung
  • U. Mall
    • MPI für Sonnensystemforschung
  • B. Wilken
    • MPI für Sonnensystemforschung
  • F. Gliem
    • Technische Universität
  • B. Fiethe
    • Technische Universität
  • T. I. Gombosi
    • University of Michigan, Space Physics Research Laboratory
  • B. Block
    • University of Michigan, Space Physics Research Laboratory
  • G. R. Carignan
    • University of Michigan, Space Physics Research Laboratory
  • L. A. Fisk
    • University of Michigan, Space Physics Research Laboratory
  • J. H. Waite
    • Southwest Research Institute
  • D. T. Young
    • Southwest Research Institute
  • H. Wollnik
    • University of Giessen, Physik Institut
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11214-006-8335-3

Cite this article as:
Balsiger, H., Altwegg, K., Bochsler, P. et al. Space Sci Rev (2007) 128: 745. doi:10.1007/s11214-006-8335-3

Abstract

The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) will answer important questions posed by the mission’s main objectives. After Giotto, this will be the first time the volatile part of a comet will be analyzed in situ. This is a very important investigation, as comets, in contrast to meteorites, have maintained most of the volatiles of the solar nebula. To accomplish the very demanding objectives through all the different phases of the comet’s activity, ROSINA has unprecedented capabilities including very wide mass range (1 to >300 amu), very high mass resolution (mm > 3000, i.e. the ability to resolve CO from N2 and 13C from 12CH), very wide dynamic range and high sensitivity, as well as the ability to determine cometary gas velocities, and temperature. ROSINA consists of two mass spectrometers for neutrals and primary ions with complementary capabilities and a pressure sensor. To ensure that absolute gas densities can be determined, each mass spectrometer carries a reservoir of a calibrated gas mixture allowing in-flight calibration. Furthermore, identical flight-spares of all three sensors will serve for detailed analysis of all relevant parameters, in particular the sensitivities for complex organic molecules and their fragmentation patterns in our electron bombardment ion sources.

Keywords

cometcoma compositionmass spectrometryRosetta

Abbreviations

ADC

analogue-to-digital converter

ASP

acceleration supply pack

CASYMIR

calibration system for the mass spectrometer instrument ROSINA

CEM

channel electron multiplier

COPS

comet pressure sensor

DFMS

double focusing magnetic mass spectrometer

DPU

data processing unit

EGSE

electrical ground support equipment

ESA

electroStatic analyzer

ETS

equivalent time sampling

ETSL

equivalent time sampling light

FC

Faraday cup

FDP

floating detector pack

FEC

filament emission controller

FIFO

first in first out

FM

flight model

FOV

field of view

FS

flight spare model

GCU

gas calibration unit

HV

high voltage

IMS

ion mass spectrometer on Giotto

LEDA

linear electron detector array

LVPS

low voltage power supply

MCP

multichannel plate

MCP

main controller

MEP

main electronics pack

MLI

multiLayer insulation

MS

mass spectrometer

NMS

neutral mass spectrometer on Giotto

RDP

remote detector pack

ROSINA

Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis

RTOF

reflectron type time-of-flight mass spectrometer

SEL

single event latch-up

SEU

single event upset

TDC

time-to-digital converter

TIMAS

toroidal imaging mass angle spectrograph

TOF

time of flight

UHV

ultra-high vacuum

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2007