Article

Space Science Reviews

, Volume 128, Issue 1, pp 745-801

First online:

Rosina – Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis

  • H. BalsigerAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
  • , K. AltweggAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern Email author 
  • , P. BochslerAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
  • , P. EberhardtAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
  • , J. FischerAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
  • , S. GrafAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
  • , A. JäckelAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
  • , E. KoppAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
  • , U. LangerAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
    • , M. MildnerAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
    • , J. MüllerAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
    • , T. RiesenAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
    • , M. RubinAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
    • , S. SchererAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
    • , P. WurzAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
    • , S. WüthrichAffiliated withPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bern
    • , E. ArijsAffiliated withBelgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
    • , S. DelanoyeAffiliated withBelgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
    • , J. De KeyserAffiliated withBelgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
    • , E. NeefsAffiliated withBelgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
    • , D. NevejansAffiliated withBelgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA)
    • , H. RèmeAffiliated withCESR
    • , C. AoustinAffiliated withCESR
    • , C. MazelleAffiliated withCESR
    • , J.-L. MédaleAffiliated withCESR
    • , J. A. SauvaudAffiliated withCESR
    • , J.-J. BerthelierAffiliated withIPSL
    • , J.-L. BertauxAffiliated withIPSL
    • , L. DuvetAffiliated withIPSL
    • , J.-M. IllianoAffiliated withIPSL
    • , S. A. FuselierAffiliated withLockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center
    • , A. G. GhielmettiAffiliated withLockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center
    • , T. MagoncelliAffiliated withLockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center
    • , E. G. ShelleyAffiliated withLockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center
    • , A. KorthAffiliated withMPI für Sonnensystemforschung
    • , K. HeerleinAffiliated withMPI für Sonnensystemforschung
    • , H. LaucheAffiliated withMPI für Sonnensystemforschung
    • , S. LiviAffiliated withMPI für Sonnensystemforschung
    • , A. LooseAffiliated withMPI für Sonnensystemforschung
    • , U. MallAffiliated withMPI für Sonnensystemforschung
    • , B. WilkenAffiliated withMPI für Sonnensystemforschung
    • , F. GliemAffiliated withTechnische Universität
    • , B. FietheAffiliated withTechnische Universität
    • , T. I. GombosiAffiliated withUniversity of Michigan, Space Physics Research Laboratory
    • , B. BlockAffiliated withUniversity of Michigan, Space Physics Research Laboratory
    • , G. R. CarignanAffiliated withUniversity of Michigan, Space Physics Research Laboratory
    • , L. A. FiskAffiliated withUniversity of Michigan, Space Physics Research Laboratory
    • , J. H. WaiteAffiliated withSouthwest Research Institute
    • , D. T. YoungAffiliated withSouthwest Research Institute
    • , H. WollnikAffiliated withUniversity of Giessen, Physik Institut

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) will answer important questions posed by the mission’s main objectives. After Giotto, this will be the first time the volatile part of a comet will be analyzed in situ. This is a very important investigation, as comets, in contrast to meteorites, have maintained most of the volatiles of the solar nebula. To accomplish the very demanding objectives through all the different phases of the comet’s activity, ROSINA has unprecedented capabilities including very wide mass range (1 to >300 amu), very high mass resolution (mm > 3000, i.e. the ability to resolve CO from N2 and 13C from 12CH), very wide dynamic range and high sensitivity, as well as the ability to determine cometary gas velocities, and temperature. ROSINA consists of two mass spectrometers for neutrals and primary ions with complementary capabilities and a pressure sensor. To ensure that absolute gas densities can be determined, each mass spectrometer carries a reservoir of a calibrated gas mixture allowing in-flight calibration. Furthermore, identical flight-spares of all three sensors will serve for detailed analysis of all relevant parameters, in particular the sensitivities for complex organic molecules and their fragmentation patterns in our electron bombardment ion sources.

Keywords

comet coma composition mass spectrometry Rosetta