Space Science Reviews

, Volume 115, Issue 1, pp 299–361

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph Investigation

Authors

    • University of ColoradoLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
  • Charles A. Barth
    • University of ColoradoLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
  • Joshua E. Colwell
    • University of ColoradoLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
  • George M. Lawrence
    • University of ColoradoLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
  • William E. McClintock
    • University of ColoradoLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
  • A. Ian F. Stewart
    • University of ColoradoLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
  • H. Uwe Keller
    • Max-Planck-Institut für Aeronomie
  • Axel Korth
    • Max-Planck-Institut für Aeronomie
  • Hans Lauche
    • Max-Planck-Institut für Aeronomie
  • Michel C. Festou
    • Observatoire Midi-Pyr’en’ees
  • Arthur L. Lane
    • Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Candice J. Hansen
    • Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Justin N. Maki
    • Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Robert A. West
    • Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Herbert Jahn
    • Deutsches Zentrum für Luft und RaumfahrtInstitut für Weltraumsensorik und Planetenerkundung
  • Ralf Reulke
    • Deutsches Zentrum für Luft und RaumfahrtInstitut für Weltraumsensorik und Planetenerkundung
  • Kerstin Warlich
    • Deutsches Zentrum für Luft und RaumfahrtInstitut für Weltraumsensorik und Planetenerkundung
  • Donald E. Shemansky
    • University of Southern CaliforniaDepartment of Aerospace Engineering
  • Yuk L. Yung
    • California Institute of TechnologyDivision of Geological and Planetary Sciences
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11214-004-1455-8

Cite this article as:
Esposito, L.W., Barth, C.A., Colwell, J.E. et al. Space Sci Rev (2004) 115: 299. doi:10.1007/s11214-004-1455-8

Abstract

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) is part of the remote sensing payload of the Cassini orbiter spacecraft. UVIS has two spectrographic channels that provide images and spectra covering the ranges from 56 to 118 nm and 110 to 190 nm. A third optical path with a solar blind CsI photocathode is used for high signal-to-noise-ratio stellar occultations by rings and atmospheres. A separate Hydrogen Deuterium Absorption Cell measures the relative abundance of deuterium and hydrogen from their Lyman-α emission. The UVIS science objectives include investigation of the chemistry, aerosols, clouds, and energy balance of the Titan and Saturn atmospheres; neutrals in the Saturn magnetosphere; the deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio for Titan and Saturn; icy satellite surface properties; and the structure and evolution of Saturn’s rings.

Keywords:

CassiniringsSaturnspectroscopy on Titan and on Saturn
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004