Social Indicators Research

, 79:503

Housing Well-Being: Developing and Validating a Measure

  • Stephan Grzeskowiak
  • M. Joseph Sirgy
  • Dong-Jin Lee
  • C. B. Claiborne
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11205-005-5667-4

Cite this article as:
Grzeskowiak, S., Sirgy, M.J., Lee, D. et al. Soc Indic Res (2006) 79: 503. doi:10.1007/s11205-005-5667-4

Abstract

Housing well-being refers to the home resident’s cumulative positive and negative affect associated with the purchase, preparation, ownership, use, and maintenance of the current home, and the selling of the previous home. Housing well-being is assumed to occur when the home is bought with the least amount of effort (purchase), the home is prepared for use to meet the needs of the new occupants (preparation), ownership signals status and enhances the home owner’s financial portfolio (ownership), the home serves the housing needs of the residents (use), the maintenance, renovation, and repair in the home are minimal, least costly, and effortless (maintenance), and the sale of the home is transacted with the least amount of effort and most financial gain (selling). Based on this conceptualization of housing well-being, we conducted an exploratory study to identify the sources of satisfaction related to the purchase, preparation, ownership, use, and maintenance of the current home, and the selling of the previous home. The exploratory study also helped us articulate a theoretical model describing the interrelationships among the housing well-being constructs and their consequence: the perceived quality-of-life (QOL) impact of the home. The exploratory study helped us also to develop survey measures, which in turn were validated through two additional studies involving surveys of home owners in the US and Korea.

Key words

housing well-beinghousing and quality of lifehousing satisfactionresidential satisfactionperceived quality-of-life impact of homeresidential well being

Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephan Grzeskowiak
    • 1
  • M. Joseph Sirgy
    • 2
  • Dong-Jin Lee
    • 3
  • C. B. Claiborne
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of MarketingUniversity of Saint ThomasMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Marketing, Pamplin College of BusinessVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  3. 3.School of BusinessYonsei UniversitySeoulKorea
  4. 4.MarketingTexas Southern UniversityUSA