Social Indicators Research

, Volume 73, Issue 1, pp 43–70

The Time-Pressure Illusion: Discretionary Time vs. Free Time

Authors

    • Social & Political Theory Program Research School of Social SciencesAustralian National University
  • James Mahmud Rice
    • Social & Political Theory Program Research School of Social SciencesAustralian National University
  • Michael Bittman
    • Social Policy Research CentreUniversity of New South Wales
  • Peter Saunders
    • Social Policy Research CentreUniversity of New South Wales
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11205-004-4642-9

Cite this article as:
Goodin, R.E., Rice, J.M., Bittman, M. et al. Soc Indic Res (2005) 73: 43. doi:10.1007/s11205-004-4642-9

Abstract

People’s welfare is a function of both time and money. People can – and, it is said, increasingly do – suffer time-poverty as well as money-poverty. It is undeniably true that people feel increasingly time pressured, particularly in dual-earner households. But much of the time devoted to paid and unpaid tasks is over and above that which is strictly necessary. In that sense, much of the time pressure that people feel is discretionary and of their own making. Using data from the 1992 Australian Time Use Survey, this paper demonstrates that the magnitude of this ‘time-pressure illusion’ varies across population groups, being least among lone parents and greatest among the childless and two-earner couples.

Keywords

discretionary timefree timeleisuretime pressuretime use
Download to read the full article text

Copyright information

© Springer 2005