Sex Roles

, Volume 63, Issue 9, pp 657–671

Others as Objects: How Women and Men Perceive the Consequences of Self-Objectification

  • Anna-Kaisa Newheiser
  • Marianne LaFrance
  • John F. Dovidio
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11199-010-9879-y

Cite this article as:
Newheiser, AK., LaFrance, M. & Dovidio, J.F. Sex Roles (2010) 63: 657. doi:10.1007/s11199-010-9879-y

Abstract

Although the negative psychological impact of self-objectification is well-documented, whether people generally recognize this impact in other people remains unclear. We hypothesized that due to their relatively limited experience with self-objectification, men are less likely than women to perceive its ramifications. In Study 1a, where 132 U.S. undergraduates were induced to perceive a female target as self-objectifying, women saw more negative emotions in her. Study 1b, using a U.S. online sample (N = 170), indicated that this difference was not due to participants’ own state of self-objectification. In Study 2, when participants (U.S. online sample, N = 84) identified with objectified targets, women again reported stronger negative reactions, further supporting our hypothesis. Implications and future directions are discussed.

Keywords

Self-objectification Sexual objectification Gender differences Emotions 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna-Kaisa Newheiser
    • 1
  • Marianne LaFrance
    • 1
  • John F. Dovidio
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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