Sex Roles

, Volume 62, Issue 7, pp 532–544

How Nice of Us and How Dumb of Me: The Effect of Exposure to Benevolent Sexism on Women’s Task and Relational Self-Descriptions

  • Manuela Barreto
  • Naomi Ellemers
  • Laura Piebinga
  • Miguel Moya
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11199-009-9699-0

Cite this article as:
Barreto, M., Ellemers, N., Piebinga, L. et al. Sex Roles (2010) 62: 532. doi:10.1007/s11199-009-9699-0

Abstract

This research demonstrates how women assimilate to benevolent sexism by emphasizing their relational qualities and de-emphasizing their task-related characteristics when exposed to benevolent sexism. Studies 1 (N = 62) and 2 (N = 100) show, with slightly different paradigms and measures, that compared to exposure to hostile sexism, exposure to benevolent sexism increases the extent to which female Dutch college students define themselves in relational terms and decreases the extent to which they emphasize their task-related characteristics. Study 3 (N = 79) demonstrates that benevolent sexism has more pernicious effects when it is expressed by someone with whom women expect to collaborate than when no collaboration is expected with the source of sexism. The implications of these results are discussed.

Keywords

Benevolent sexism Women’s self-descriptions Task-related and relational self-descriptions Stereotype confirmation 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manuela Barreto
    • 1
  • Naomi Ellemers
    • 2
  • Laura Piebinga
    • 2
  • Miguel Moya
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Social Research and Intervention (CIS), Av das Forças Armadas-Ed ISCTELisbonPortugal
  2. 2.Leiden Institute for Psychological ResearchLeiden UniversityLeidenthe Netherlands
  3. 3.University of GranadaGranadaSpain