Sex Roles

, Volume 57, Issue 5, pp 355–363

Feminism: What is it Good For? Feminine Norms and Objectification as the Link between Feminist Identity and Clinically Relevant Outcomes

  • Molly M. Hurt
  • Jaclyn A. Nelson
  • Dixie L. Turner
  • Megan E. Haines
  • Laura R. Ramsey
  • Mindy J. Erchull
  • Miriam Liss
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11199-007-9272-7

Cite this article as:
Hurt, M.M., Nelson, J.A., Turner, D.L. et al. Sex Roles (2007) 57: 355. doi:10.1007/s11199-007-9272-7

Abstract

The goal of this study was to explore the relationships between feminism and clinical outcomes, such as eating attitudes, depression, and self-esteem, employing structural equation modeling to look at indirect relationships. This study examined female participants’ (N = 282) responses to an online survey measuring feminist self-identification, conformity to feminine norms, objectified body consciousness, eating attitudes, depression, and self-esteem. Participants were recruited on two college campuses and through online listservs. Feminist self-identification was related to rejecting the feminine norms of thinness, appearance, and the importance of romantic relationships. Endorsing these norms was related to increased body surveillance and shame. Objectification variables were related to negative clinical outcomes. Thus, feminism is a distal, rather than proximal, influence on clinical variables.

Keywords

Feminist identityEating attitudesSelf-objectification

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Molly M. Hurt
    • 1
  • Jaclyn A. Nelson
    • 1
  • Dixie L. Turner
    • 1
  • Megan E. Haines
    • 1
  • Laura R. Ramsey
    • 1
  • Mindy J. Erchull
    • 1
  • Miriam Liss
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Mary WashingtonFredericksburgUSA