Science & Education

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 313–334

Building a Foundation for the Use of Historical Narratives

  • Don Metz
  • Stephen Klassen
  • Barbara McMillan
  • Michael Clough
  • Joanne Olson
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11191-006-9024-z

Cite this article as:
Metz, D., Klassen, S., McMillan, B. et al. Sci Educ (2007) 16: 313. doi:10.1007/s11191-006-9024-z

Abstract.

Many educators today advocate the use of historical narratives as one of a number of possible contexts for teaching science. However, several pedagogical and epistemological issues arise when implementing narratives in the classroom. In this paper, we are interested in expanding our view of narrative, specific to integrating the history of science and science teaching, and we extend our argument beyond simple anecdotal references to recognise the benefits of the historical narrative in a variety of ways. At the same time, we address pedagogical concerns by broadening perceptions of the manner and contexts in which narratives can be developed so as to include imaginative and manipulative elements that provide interactive experiences for students that are more conducive to implementation by science teachers. Several practical examples are presented as illustrations of historical narratives with imaginative and manipulative elements that by design facilitate a more meaningful implementation in the science classroom.

Keywords

narrativeshistory of sciencescience educationstory

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don Metz
    • 1
  • Stephen Klassen
    • 2
  • Barbara McMillan
    • 3
  • Michael Clough
    • 4
  • Joanne Olson
    • 4
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of WinnipegWinnipegCanada
  2. 2.Physics DepartmentUniversity of WinnipegWinnipegCanada
  3. 3.Faculty of EducationUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  4. 4.Department of Curriculum and LearningIowa State UniversityAmesUSA