Journal of Risk and Uncertainty

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 165–183

Risk aversion and religion

  • Charles N. Noussair
  • Stefan T. Trautmann
  • Gijs van de Kuilen
  • Nathanael Vellekoop
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11166-013-9174-8

Cite this article as:
Noussair, C.N., Trautmann, S.T., van de Kuilen, G. et al. J Risk Uncertain (2013) 47: 165. doi:10.1007/s11166-013-9174-8

Abstract

We use a dataset for a demographically representative sample of the Dutch population that contains a revealed preference risk attitude measure, as well as detailed information about participants’ religious background, to study three issues. First, we find strong confirmatory evidence that more religious people, as measured by church membership or attendance, are more risk averse with regard to financial risks. Second, we obtain some evidence that Protestants are more risk averse than Catholics in such tasks. Third, our data suggest that the link between risk aversion and religion is driven by social aspects of church membership, rather than by religious beliefs themselves.

Keywords

Risk aversion Religion Catholicism Protestantism 

JEL Classifications

C91 C93 D81 Z12 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles N. Noussair
    • 1
  • Stefan T. Trautmann
    • 1
  • Gijs van de Kuilen
    • 1
  • Nathanael Vellekoop
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsTilburg University and CentER for Economic ResearchTilburgThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Money and MacroeconomicsGoethe University Frankfurt, SAFE, and NetsparFrankfurt am MainGermany