Reading and Writing

, Volume 25, Issue 5, pp 1007–1029

Usage of statistical cues for word boundary in reading Chinese sentences

  • Miao-Hsuan Yen
  • Ralph Radach
  • Ovid J.-L. Tzeng
  • Jie-Li Tsai
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11145-011-9321-z

Cite this article as:
Yen, MH., Radach, R., Tzeng, O.JL. et al. Read Writ (2012) 25: 1007. doi:10.1007/s11145-011-9321-z

Abstract

The present study examined the use of statistical cues for word boundaries during Chinese reading. Participants were instructed to read sentences for comprehension with their eye movements being recorded. A two-character target word was embedded in each sentence. The contrast between the probabilities of the ending character (C2) of the target word (C12) being used as word beginning and ending in all words containing it was manipulated. In addition, by using the boundary paradigm, parafoveal overlapping ambiguity in the string C123 was manipulated with three types of preview of the character C3, which was a single-character word in the identical condition. During preview, the combination of C23′ was a legal word in the ambiguous condition and was not a word in the control condition. Significant probability and preview effects were observed. In the low-probability condition, inconsistency in the frequent within-word position (word beginning) and the present position (word ending) lengthened gaze durations and increased refixation rate on the target word. Although benefits from the identical previews were apparent, effects of overlapping ambiguity were negligible. The results suggest that the probability of within-word positions had an influence during character-to-word assignment, which was mainly verified during foveal processing. Thus, the overlapping ambiguity between parafoveal words did not interfere with reading. Further investigation is necessary to examine whether current computational models of eye movement control should incorporate statistical cues for word boundaries together with other linguistic factors in their word processing system to account for Chinese reading.

Keywords

Chinese readingEye movementsWord processingWord segmentation cues

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miao-Hsuan Yen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ralph Radach
    • 3
  • Ovid J.-L. Tzeng
    • 1
    • 4
  • Jie-Li Tsai
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratories for Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of NeuroscienceNational Yang-Ming UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Psychology and Research Center for Mind, Brain, and LearningNational Chengchi UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  3. 3.General and Biological PsychologyUniversity of WuppertalWuppertalGermany
  4. 4.The Institute of LinguisticsAcademia SinicaTaipeiTaiwan