Reading and Writing

, Volume 23, Issue 5, pp 569–588

Lexical-semantic reading in a shallow orthography: evidence from a girl with Williams Syndrome

  • Laura Barca
  • Arianna Bello
  • Virginia Volterra
  • Cristina Burani
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11145-009-9192-8

Cite this article as:
Barca, L., Bello, A., Volterra, V. et al. Read Writ (2010) 23: 569. doi:10.1007/s11145-009-9192-8
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Abstract

The reading skills of a girl with Williams Syndrome are assessed by a timed word-naming task. To test the efficiency of lexical and nonlexical reading, we considered four marker effects: Lexicality (better reading of words than nonwords), frequency (better reading of high than low frequency words), length (better reading of short than long words), and contextuality (better reading of words with one-to-one grapheme-to-phoneme mapping than words with context-sensitive graphemes). Results suggested that this girl has failed to develop efficient orthography-to-phonology mappings and is dependent upon a lexical-semantic reading procedure in which a word’s pronunciation is activated after its meaning is obtained.

Keywords

Williams Syndrome Neurodevelopmental disease Lexical-semantic reading Reading aloud Shallow orthography 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura Barca
    • 1
  • Arianna Bello
    • 2
  • Virginia Volterra
    • 3
  • Cristina Burani
    • 3
  1. 1.Pediatric Neuro-Rehabilitation Division, Children’s Hospital Bambino GesùIRCCSRomeItaly
  2. 2.Department of NeuroscienceUniversity of ParmaParmaItaly
  3. 3.Institute for Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, ISTC-CNRRomaItaly

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