Quality of Life Research

, Volume 24, Issue 8, pp 1809–1822

Testing item response theory invariance of the standardized Quality-of-life Disease Impact Scale (QDIS®) in acute coronary syndrome patients: differential functioning of items and test

  • Nina Deng
  • Milena D. Anatchkova
  • Molly E. Waring
  • Kyung T. Han
  • John E. WareJr.
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11136-015-0916-8

Cite this article as:
Deng, N., Anatchkova, M.D., Waring, M.E. et al. Qual Life Res (2015) 24: 1809. doi:10.1007/s11136-015-0916-8

Abstract

Purpose

The Quality-of-life (QOL) Disease Impact Scale (QDIS®) standardizes the content and scoring of QOL impact attributed to different diseases using item response theory (IRT). This study examined the IRT invariance of the QDIS-standardized IRT parameters in an independent sample.

Method

The differential functioning of items and test (DFIT) of a static short-form (QDIS-7) was examined across two independent sources: patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the TRACE-CORE study (N = 1,544) and chronically ill US adults in the QDIS standardization sample. “ACS-specific” IRT item parameters were calibrated and linearly transformed to compare to “standardized” IRT item parameters. Differences in IRT model-expected item, scale and theta scores were examined. The DFIT results were also compared in a standard logistic regression differential item functioning analysis.

Results

Item parameters estimated in the ACS sample showed lower discrimination parameters than the standardized discrimination parameters, but only small differences were found for thresholds parameters. In DFIT, results on the non-compensatory differential item functioning index (range 0.005–0.074) were all below the threshold of 0.096. Item differences were further canceled out at the scale level. IRT-based theta scores for ACS patients using standardized and ACS-specific item parameters were highly correlated (r = 0.995, root-mean-square difference = 0.09). Using standardized item parameters, ACS patients scored one-half standard deviation higher (indicating greater QOL impact) compared to chronically ill adults in the standardization sample.

Conclusion

The study showed sufficient IRT invariance to warrant the use of standardized IRT scoring of QDIS-7 for studies comparing the QOL impact attributed to acute coronary disease and other chronic conditions.

Keywords

Item response theory invariance Differential item functioning Differential test (scale) functioning Measurement invariance Disease-specific quality-of-life measures 

Abbreviations

ACS

Acute coronary syndrome

ACS-LT

ACS-specific linearly transformed

CAT

Computerized adaptive testing

CDIF

Compensatory differential item functioning

CFA

Confirmatory factor analysis

DFIT

Differential functioning of items and tests

DICAT

The computerized adaptive Assessment of disease impact project

DIF

Differential item functioning

DTF

Differential test (scale) functioning

GPCM

Generalized partial credit model

ICC

Item characteristic curve

IPD

Item parameter drift

IRT

Item response theory

MLHFQ

Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire

NCDIF

Non-compensatory differential item functioning

PRO

Patient-reported outcome

PROMIS

Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System

QDIS®

Quality-of-life Disease Impact Scale

QDIS-7

7-item short-form of QDIS®

QOL

Quality-of-life

RMSD

Root-mean-square difference

SAQ

Seattle Angina Questionnaire

TCC

Test characteristic curve

TRACE-CORE

The Transitions, Risks, and Actions in Coronary Events-Center for Outcomes Research and Education project

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nina Deng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Milena D. Anatchkova
    • 1
    • 3
  • Molly E. Waring
    • 1
  • Kyung T. Han
    • 4
  • John E. WareJr.
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Quantitative Health SciencesUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  2. 2.Measured Progress, Inc.DoverUSA
  3. 3.EvideraLexingtonUSA
  4. 4.Graduate Management Admission CouncilRestonUSA
  5. 5.John Ware Research Group, IncorporatedWorcesterUSA