Quality of Life Research

, Volume 21, Issue 10, pp 1685–1694

The effect of weight loss on changes in health-related quality of life among overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence

  • Angela Marinilli Pinto
  • Leslee L. Subak
  • Sanae Nakagawa
  • Eric Vittinghoff
  • Rena R. Wing
  • John W. Kusek
  • William H. Herman
  • Delia Smith West
  • Miriam Kuppermann
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11136-011-0086-2

Cite this article as:
Pinto, A.M., Subak, L.L., Nakagawa, S. et al. Qual Life Res (2012) 21: 1685. doi:10.1007/s11136-011-0086-2
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Abstract

Objective

To estimate the effect of change in weight and change in urinary incontinence (UI) frequency on changes in preference-based measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL) among overweight and obese women with UI participating in a weight loss trial.

Methods

We conducted a longitudinal cohort analysis of 338 overweight and obese women with UI enrolled in a randomized clinical trial comparing a behavioral weight loss intervention to an educational control condition. At baseline, 6, and 18 months, health utilities were estimated using the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3), a transformation of the SF-36 to the preference-based SF-6D, and the estimated Quality of Well-Being (eQWB) score (a summary calculated from the SF-36 physical functioning, mental health, bodily pain, general health perceptions, and role limitations–physical subscale scores). Potential predictors of changes in these outcomes were examined using generalized estimating equations.

Results

In adjusted multivariable models, weight loss was associated with improvement in HUI3, SF-6D, and eQWB at 6 and 18 months (P < 0.05). Increases in physical activity also were independently associated with improvement in HUI3 (P = 0.01) and SF-6D (P = 0.006) scores at 18 months. In contrast, reduction in UI frequency did not predict improvements in HRQL at 6 or 18 months.

Conclusion

Weight loss and increased physical activity, but not reduction in UI frequency, were strongly associated with improvements in health utilities measured by the HUI3, SF-6D, and eQWB. These findings provide important information that can be used to inform cost–utility analyses of weight loss interventions.

Keywords

Quality of life Weight loss Urinary incontinence HUI eQWB SF-6D 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela Marinilli Pinto
    • 1
  • Leslee L. Subak
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Sanae Nakagawa
    • 2
  • Eric Vittinghoff
    • 3
  • Rena R. Wing
    • 5
  • John W. Kusek
    • 6
  • William H. Herman
    • 7
  • Delia Smith West
    • 8
  • Miriam Kuppermann
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentBaruch College, CUNYNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive SciencesUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology & BiostatisticsUCSFSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.Department of UrologyUCSFSan FranciscoUSA
  5. 5.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorWarren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  6. 6.National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney DiseasesBethesdaUSA
  7. 7.Department of Internal Medicine and EpidemiologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  8. 8.Department of Health Behavior and Health EducationUniversity of Arkansas for Medical SciencesLittle RockUSA

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