Article

Quality of Life Research

, Volume 21, Issue 7, pp 1223-1240

PROMIS® Parent Proxy Report Scales: an item response theory analysis of the parent proxy report item banks

  • James W. VarniAffiliated withDepartment of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, College of Architecture, Texas A&M University Email author 
  • , David ThissenAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • , Brian D. StuckyAffiliated withRAND Corporation
  • , Yang LiuAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • , Hally GorderAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • , Debra E. IrwinAffiliated withDepartment of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • , Esi Morgan DeWittAffiliated withDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • , Jin-Shei LaiAffiliated withDepartment of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • , Dagmar AmtmannAffiliated withDepartment of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington
    • , Darren A. DeWaltAffiliated withDivision of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Objective

The objective of the present study is to describe the item response theory (IRT) analysis of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) pediatric parent proxy-report item banks and the measurement properties of the new PROMIS® Parent Proxy Report Scales for ages 8–17 years.

Methods

Parent proxy-report items were written to parallel the pediatric self-report items. Test forms containing the items were completed by 1,548 parent–child pairs. CCFA and IRT analyses of scale dimensionality and item local dependence, and IRT analyses of differential item functioning were conducted.

Results

Parent proxy-report item banks were developed and IRT parameters are provided. The recommended unidimensional short forms for the PROMIS® Parent Proxy Report Scales are item sets that are subsets of the pediatric self-report short forms, setting aside items for which parent responses exhibit local dependence. Parent proxy-report demonstrated moderate to low agreement with pediatric self-report.

Conclusions

The study provides initial calibrations of the PROMIS® parent proxy-report item banks and the creation of the PROMIS® Parent Proxy-Report Scales. It is anticipated that these new scales will have application for pediatric populations in which pediatric self-report is not feasible.

Keywords

PROMIS® Parent proxy report Item response theory