Quality of Life Research

, Volume 21, Issue 7, pp 1223–1240

PROMIS® Parent Proxy Report Scales: an item response theory analysis of the parent proxy report item banks

  • James W. Varni
  • David Thissen
  • Brian D. Stucky
  • Yang Liu
  • Hally Gorder
  • Debra E. Irwin
  • Esi Morgan DeWitt
  • Jin-Shei Lai
  • Dagmar Amtmann
  • Darren A. DeWalt
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11136-011-0025-2

Cite this article as:
Varni, J.W., Thissen, D., Stucky, B.D. et al. Qual Life Res (2012) 21: 1223. doi:10.1007/s11136-011-0025-2

Abstract

Objective

The objective of the present study is to describe the item response theory (IRT) analysis of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) pediatric parent proxy-report item banks and the measurement properties of the new PROMIS® Parent Proxy Report Scales for ages 8–17 years.

Methods

Parent proxy-report items were written to parallel the pediatric self-report items. Test forms containing the items were completed by 1,548 parent–child pairs. CCFA and IRT analyses of scale dimensionality and item local dependence, and IRT analyses of differential item functioning were conducted.

Results

Parent proxy-report item banks were developed and IRT parameters are provided. The recommended unidimensional short forms for the PROMIS® Parent Proxy Report Scales are item sets that are subsets of the pediatric self-report short forms, setting aside items for which parent responses exhibit local dependence. Parent proxy-report demonstrated moderate to low agreement with pediatric self-report.

Conclusions

The study provides initial calibrations of the PROMIS® parent proxy-report item banks and the creation of the PROMIS® Parent Proxy-Report Scales. It is anticipated that these new scales will have application for pediatric populations in which pediatric self-report is not feasible.

Keywords

PROMIS®Parent proxy reportItem response theory

Abbreviations

PROMIS®

Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System

FDA

Food and drug administration

HRQOL

Health-related quality of life

NIH

National Institute of Health

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • James W. Varni
    • 1
  • David Thissen
    • 2
  • Brian D. Stucky
    • 3
  • Yang Liu
    • 2
  • Hally Gorder
    • 2
  • Debra E. Irwin
    • 4
  • Esi Morgan DeWitt
    • 5
  • Jin-Shei Lai
    • 6
  • Dagmar Amtmann
    • 7
  • Darren A. DeWalt
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, College of ArchitectureTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.RAND CorporationSanta MonicaUSA
  4. 4.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  5. 5.Department of Pediatrics, Division of RheumatologyCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  6. 6.Department of Medical Social SciencesNorthwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  7. 7.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  8. 8.Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services ResearchUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA