Quality of Life Research

, Volume 16, Issue 6, pp 947–960

Fatigue in breast cancer survivors two to five years post diagnosis: a HEAL Study report

Authors

  • Kathleen Meeske
    • Department of Preventive MedicineKeck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Ashley Wilder Smith
    • Outcomes Research Branch, Applied Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer Institute, EPN 4005
  • Catherine M. Alfano
    • College of Public Health and Comprehensive Cancer CenterThe Ohio State University
  • Bonnie A. McGregor
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Anne McTiernan
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Kathy B. Baumgartner
    • Epidemiology and Clinical Investigation Sciences, School of Public Health & Information SciencesUniversity of Louisville
  • Kathleen E. Malone
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Bryce B. Reeve
    • Outcomes Research Branch, Applied Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer Institute, EPN 4005
  • Rachel Ballard-Barbash
    • Outcomes Research Branch, Applied Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer Institute, EPN 4005
    • Department of Preventive MedicineKeck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11136-007-9215-3

Cite this article as:
Meeske, K., Smith, A.W., Alfano, C.M. et al. Qual Life Res (2007) 16: 947. doi:10.1007/s11136-007-9215-3

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate prevalence of fatigue, identify correlates of fatigue and evaluate the relationship between fatigue and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a large cohort of disease-free breast cancer survivors.

Methods Participants are enrolled in the HEAL Study, a multi-center prospective study of women diagnosed with in-situ to Stage IIIA breast cancer. HEAL participants (n = 1183) completed a baseline and a 24-month follow-up interview. Women in this report (n = 800) also completed a quality of life questionnaire that included the Piper Fatigue Scale and the RAND SF-36 two to five years after diagnosis. Multivariate regression methods were used to identify significant factors associated with fatigue. SF-36 scores for fatigued survivors were compared to non-fatigued survivor scores and population norms.

Results Forty-one percent of the breast cancer survivors were fatigued. Significant correlates of fatigue included pain, cognitive problems, physical inactivity, weight gain/personal appearance and antidepressant use. Fatigue was associated with poorer HRQOL, most notably in areas of role and social functioning.

Conclusion This study provides further support for the conclusion that a significant proportion of breast cancer survivors experience fatigue that compromises HRQOL two to five years post-diagnosis.

Keywords

Breast cancer survivorsFatigueQuality of lifePiper Fatigue Scale

Abbreviations

HRQOL

Health-Related Quality Of Life

QOL

Quality Of Life

SEER

Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results

HEAL

Health, Eating, Activity and Lifestyle

OR

Odds Ratio

R-PFS

Revised-Piper Fatigue Scale

BCPT

Breast Cancer Prevention Trial

HSC

Hormone-related Symptom Checklist

SF-36

Short Form-36

sd

Standard deviation

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007