Quality of Life Research

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 547–558

Self-Reported Health in High and Very High Incomes

  • Georgios D. Mantzavinis
  • Thomas A. Trikalinos
  • Ioannis D. K. Dimoliatis
  • John P. A. Ioannidis
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11136-005-1770-x

Cite this article as:
Mantzavinis, G.D., Trikalinos, T.A., Dimoliatis, I.D.K. et al. Qual Life Res (2006) 15: 547. doi:10.1007/s11136-005-1770-x

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to investigate whether self-reported health (SRH), an overall health indicator, continues to improve as individual income increases to very high levels or whether there is a threshold above which this relationship changes direction. We used data from the 2003 US Current Population Survey, focusing on the upper income decile. We modelled the relationship between income and SRH before and after adjustment for other socio-demographic parameters that are known to influence SRH. In the unadjusted model, SRH increased with increasing income up to the threshold of $326,000, above which SRH declined. After adjustment for all major socio-demographic parameters (age, gender, race, education, and marital status), the adjusted curve showed monotonically increasing SRH with increasing income. Adjustment for each of these parameters separately revealed that the threshold effect was lost only after adjusting for education. There were more people with low levels of educational attainment among those receiving more than $500,000 per year, compared to other people in the upper income decile. Increasing income does not always improve SRH. People in the very high income bracket tend to report slightly worse health, which may be explained by their lower education.

Keywords

EducationHealth statusIncomeSocioeconomic factors

Abbreviations

SRH

self-reported health

Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georgios D. Mantzavinis
    • 1
  • Thomas A. Trikalinos
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ioannis D. K. Dimoliatis
    • 1
  • John P. A. Ioannidis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Hygiene and EpidemiologyUniversity of Ioannina School of MedicineIoanninaGreece
  2. 2.Department of Medicine, Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy StudiesTufts-New England Medical Center, Tufts University School of MedicineBostonUSA