, Volume 64, Issue 2, pp 174-180
Date: 22 May 2009

Variability of Nutritional and Cooking Quality in Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) as a Function of Genotype

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Abstract

Screening of natural biodiversity for the better quality traits are of prime importance for quality breeding programs. The objective of this investigation was to select candidate accession of bean having high concentrations of protein as well as macro and micro minerals with good cooking quality for use as parents in breeding programme for these compounds. Thirty-five accessions of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) were field grown and their seeds were analyzed for their cooking quality and nutritional composition. Wide variations were observed in most of the measurements e.g. protein (18.7–26.2%), iron (79.4–137.6 ppm) and hardness after cooking (4.65–9.88 Kg) suggesting that there are considerable levels of genetic diversity. Across all accessions the concentration of potassium was negatively correlated with protein (r = −0.43, P < 0.05). Concentrations of protein was significantly greater in accessions VIII, XIII and XIX compared to other accessions analyzed. Iron concentrations were greatest (137 ppm) in XIX and lowest (79 ppm) in XXVII. Lines with less cooking time were line III, X, XXVI, XXX and XXXI. Bean line XIX contains high protein (24.9%) with high zinc (33.3 ppm) and highest iron (137.6 ppm), but it has high hardness after cooking (7.32 kg). Four clusters were computed by cluster analysis that explained quite a good variation in the traits. The great variability for these attributes suggests that these selected accessions may be useful as parents in hybridization programs to produce bean with value-added traits. This information was also potentially useful for pulse breeders working on the development of new varieties.