Prevention Science

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 197–206

Concurrent Alcohol Use or Heavier Use of Alcohol and Cigarette Smoking Among Women of Childbearing Age with Accessible Health Care

Authors

    • Prevention Research Branch, Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental DisabilitiesCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • R. Louise Floyd
    • Prevention Research Branch, Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental DisabilitiesCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Patricia P. Green
    • Prevention Research Branch, Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental DisabilitiesCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Clark H. Denny
    • Prevention Research Branch, Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental DisabilitiesCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Claire D. Coles
    • Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesEmory University School of Medicine
  • Robert J. Sokol
    • School of Medicine, Wayne State University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11121-009-0158-5

Cite this article as:
Tsai, J., Floyd, R.L., Green, P.P. et al. Prev Sci (2010) 11: 197. doi:10.1007/s11121-009-0158-5

Abstract

This study was conducted to provide nationally representative findings on the prevalence and distribution of concurrent alcohol use or heavier use of alcohol and cigarette smoking among women of childbearing age with accessible health care. For the years 2003–2005, a total of 20,912 women 18–44 years of age who participated in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) reported that during the study period, there was a place where they would usually go for health care when sick or in need of advice about their health. The prevalence and distribution of concurrent alcohol use or heavier use of alcohol and cigarette smoking reported by such women was calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the “most often visited health care place” among concurrent users who reported having seen or talked to a health care provider during the previous 12 months. Among surveyed women with accessible health care, 12.3% reported concurrent alcohol use and cigarette smoking, and 1.9% reported concurrent heavier use of alcohol and cigarette smoking during the study period. Of women who reported either type of concurrent use, at least 84.4% also indicated having seen or talked to one or more health care providers during the previous 12 months. Such women were more likely than non-concurrent users to indicate that the “most often visited health care place” was a “hospital emergency room or outpatient department or some other place” or a “clinic or health center,” as opposed to an “HMO or doctor’s office.” Concurrent alcohol use or heavier use of alcohol and cigarette smoking among women of childbearing age is an important public health concern in the United States. The findings of this study highlight the importance of screening and behavioral counseling interventions for excessive drinking and cigarette smoking by health care providers in both primary care and emergency department settings.

Keywords

ConcurrentAlcohol useHeavy drinkingCigarette smokingHealth careWomen

Copyright information

© Society for Prevention Research 2009