Photosynthesis Research

, Volume 84, Issue 1, pp 121–129

Measuring photosynthetic parameters at a distance: laser induced fluorescence transient (LIFT) method for remote measurements of photosynthesis in terrestrial vegetation

  • Zbigniew Kolber
  • Denis Klimov
  • Gennady Ananyev
  • Uwe Rascher
  • Joseph Berry
  • Barry Osmond
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11120-005-5092-1

Cite this article as:
Kolber, Z., Klimov, D., Ananyev, G. et al. Photosynth Res (2005) 84: 121. doi:10.1007/s11120-005-5092-1

Abstract

We have developed a laser induced fluorescence transient (LIFT) technique and instrumentation to remotely measure photosynthetic properties in terrestrial vegetation at a distance of up to 50 m. The LIFT method uses a 665 nm laser to project a collimated, 100 mm diameter excitation beam onto leaves of the targeted plant. Fluorescence emission at 690 nm is collected by a 250 mm reflective telescope and processed in real time to calculate the efficiency of photosynthetic light utilization, quantum efficiency of PS II, and the kinetics of photosynthetic electron transport. Operating with peak excitation power of 125 W m−2, and duty cycle of 10–50%, the instrument conforms to laser safety regulations. The LIFT instrument is controlled via an Internet connection, allowing it to operate from remote locations or platforms. Here we describe the theoretical basis of the LIFT methodology, and demonstrate its applications in remote measurements of photosynthetic properties in the canopy of cottonwood and oak trees, and in the rosette of Arabidopsis mutants.

Keywords

fluorescencephotosynthesisremote sensing

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zbigniew Kolber
    • 1
    • 2
  • Denis Klimov
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gennady Ananyev
    • 2
    • 3
  • Uwe Rascher
    • 2
    • 4
  • Joseph Berry
    • 2
    • 5
  • Barry Osmond
    • 2
    • 6
  1. 1.Monterey Bay Aquarium Research InstituteMoss LandingUSA
  2. 2.Biosphere 2 LaboratoryColumbia UniversityOracleUSA
  3. 3.21 Hoyt LaboratoryPrinceton UniversityPrincetonUSA
  4. 4.Institute PhytosphereForschungszentrum JülichJülichGermany
  5. 5.Department of Global EcologyCarnegie Institution of WashingtonStanfordUSA
  6. 6.School of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia