Transportation

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 255–274

Transportation and land-use preferences and residents’ neighborhood choices: the sufficiency of compact development in the Atlanta region

Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11116-006-9104-6

Cite this article as:
Levine, J. & Frank, L.D. Transportation (2007) 34: 255. doi:10.1007/s11116-006-9104-6

Abstract

This paper analyzes the transportation and land-use preference and actual neighborhood choices of a sample of 1,455 residents of metro Atlanta. We develop a stated-preference scale on which desires for neighborhood type are gauged, from preferences for low-density, auto-oriented environments to desires for compact, walkable, and transit-oriented neighborhoods. This scale is then related to desires for change in one’s own neighborhood characteristics after a hypothetical move. If all neighborhood preferences were equally likely to be satisfied, then neighborhood preferences would not be correlated with a desire for change. By contrast, in the current study, stronger preferences for a more walkable environment are associated with greater desire for change in one’s neighborhood characteristics. This suggests an undersupply of compact, walkable, and transit-friendly neighborhood types relative to current demand.

Keywords

Zoning Land-use regulation Stated preference Residential choice Smart growth Compact development 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Urban and Regional Planning Program, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban PlanningThe University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.School of Community and Regional PlanningUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada