Plant and Soil

, Volume 345, Issue 1, pp 375–385

Altered response to nitrogen supply of mixed grassland communities in a future climate: a controlled environment microcosm study

Authors

    • Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of BiologyUniversity of Antwerp (Campus Drie Eiken)
  • Kim Naudts
    • Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of BiologyUniversity of Antwerp (Campus Drie Eiken)
  • Costanza Zavalloni
    • Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of BiologyUniversity of Antwerp (Campus Drie Eiken)
    • Department of Agricultural and Environmental SciencesUniversity of Udine
  • Ivan A. Janssens
    • Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of BiologyUniversity of Antwerp (Campus Drie Eiken)
  • Reinhart Ceulemans
    • Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of BiologyUniversity of Antwerp (Campus Drie Eiken)
  • Ivan Nijs
    • Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of BiologyUniversity of Antwerp (Campus Drie Eiken)
    • King Saud University
Regular Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11104-011-0789-8

Cite this article as:
Van den Berge, J., Naudts, K., Zavalloni, C. et al. Plant Soil (2011) 345: 375. doi:10.1007/s11104-011-0789-8

Abstract

Few studies have investigated whether responses to nutrient supply of mixed plant communities change under combined elevated CO2 and climate warming. In this study we analyzed the response of constructed temperate grassland communities to five levels of nitrogen (N) supply, ranging from 0 to 150 kg N ha−1, under two climate scenarios. Biomass of the plant communities responded positively to N supply in the current climate, but was insensitive to N supply in the future climate. This altered response was not the result of a changing response from a single species, but all species seemed to contribute to it. The weaker response in the future climate was caused by changes in N uptake rather than by changes in nitrogen use efficiency, as community N stocks showed the same response pattern as community biomass. Climate change apparently modified the relation between fertilizer N addition and plant available N.

Keywords

BiomassClimate warmingElevated CO2NitrogenGrassland species

Abbreviations

SOM

Soil organic matter

Tair

Air temperature

PAR

Photosynthetically active radiation

SD

Standard deviation

vpd

Vapour pressure deficit

ET

Evapotranspiration

SWC

Soil water content

ANCOVA

Analysis of covariance

SEN

Soil extractable nitrogen

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011