Plant and Soil

, Volume 334, Issue 1, pp 475–489

Biodegradation of low molecular weight organic compounds and their contribution to heterotrophic soil respiration in three Japanese forest soils

  • Kazumichi Fujii
  • Chie Hayakawa
  • Patrick A. W. Van Hees
  • Shinya Funakawa
  • Takashi Kosaki
Regular Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11104-010-0398-y

Cite this article as:
Fujii, K., Hayakawa, C., Van Hees, P.A.W. et al. Plant Soil (2010) 334: 475. doi:10.1007/s11104-010-0398-y

Abstract

Low molecular weight (LMW) organic compounds in soil solution could be important substrates for heterotrophic soil respiration. The importance of LMW organic compound mineralization in heterotrophic soil respiration needs to be confirmed for different types of soils. The concentrations of LMW organic compounds in soil solution and mineralization kinetics of 14C-radiolabelled glucose, acetate, oxalate and citrate were studied in three Japanese forest soils (Andisol, Spodosol and Inceptisol) with varying adsorption capacities. Based on those results, the fluxes of LMW organic compound mineralization and their magnitude relative to heterotrophic soil respiration were quantified. Monosaccharides and organic acids comprised on average 5.9–11.2% and 0.9–1.4% of dissolved organic carbon in soil solution, respectively. Monosaccharide mineralization make up 49–74% of heterotrophic (basal) soil respiration at the soil-profile scale, while organic acid mineralization accounts for between 5% (Andisol) and 47–58% (Spodosol and Inceptisol) of heterotrophic soil respiration. The mineralization of LMW organic compounds is a substantial fraction of heterotrophic soil respiration regardless of soil type, owing to their rapid and continuous production and consumption. The specific contribution of organic acid mineralization to heterotrophic soil respiration varies depending on soil adsorption capacities, namely iron and aluminum oxides.

Keywords

Adsorption Dissolved organic carbon Low molecular weight organic acid Mineralization Monosaccharide Soil respiration 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazumichi Fujii
    • 1
  • Chie Hayakawa
    • 1
  • Patrick A. W. Van Hees
    • 2
  • Shinya Funakawa
    • 1
  • Takashi Kosaki
    • 3
  1. 1.Graduate School of AgricultureKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre, Department of Natural ScienceÖrebro UniversityÖrebroSweden
  3. 3.Department of Tourism ScienceTokyo Metropolitan UniversityTokyoJapan

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