Plant and Soil

, Volume 321, Issue 1, pp 259–278

Rhizosphere microbiota interfers with plant-plant interactions

  • A. Sanon
  • Z. N. Andrianjaka
  • Y. Prin
  • R. Bally
  • J. Thioulouse
  • G. Comte
  • R. Duponnois
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11104-009-0010-5

Cite this article as:
Sanon, A., Andrianjaka, Z.N., Prin, Y. et al. Plant Soil (2009) 321: 259. doi:10.1007/s11104-009-0010-5

Abstract

Diversity, structure and productivity of above-ground compartment of terrestrial ecosystems have been generally considered as the main drivers of the relationships between diversity and ecosystem functioning. More recently it has been suggested that plant population dynamics may be linked with the development of the below-ground community. The biologically active soil zone where root-root and root-microbe communications occur is named “Rhizosphere” where root exudates play active roles in regulating rhizosphere interactions. Root exudation can regulate the soil microbial community, withstand herbivory, facilitate beneficial symbioses, modify the chemical and physical soil properties and inhibit the growth of competing plant species. In this review, we explore the current knowledge assessing the importance of root exudates in plant interactions, in communications between parasitic plants and their hosts and how some soil microbial components could regulate plant species coexistence and change relationships between plants. This review will be focussed on several well documented biological processes regulating plant-plant communications such as exotic plant species invasions, negative root-root communication (allelopathy) and parasitic plant / host plant interactions and how some soil microbial components can interfere with signal traffic between roots. The reported data show that the overall effect of one plant to another results from multiple interacting mechanisms where soil microbiota can be considered as a key component.

Keywords

AllelopathyRhizospherePlant invasionsPlant-soil feedbacksParasitic plant

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Sanon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Z. N. Andrianjaka
    • 3
    • 4
  • Y. Prin
    • 5
  • R. Bally
    • 3
  • J. Thioulouse
    • 6
  • G. Comte
    • 4
  • R. Duponnois
    • 1
    • 7
  1. 1.IRD, Laboratoire Commun de Microbiologie IRD/ISRA/UCADCentre de Recherche de Bel AirDakarSénégal
  2. 2.Département de Biologie VégétaleUniversité Cheick Anta DiopDakarSénégal
  3. 3.Centre National de la Recherche Scientifiques (CNRS)Laboratoire d’Ecologie MicrobienneVilleurbanne CedexFrance
  4. 4.Centre d’Etude des Substances Naturelles (CESN)Laboratoire d’Ecologie MicrobienneVilleurbanne CedexFrance
  5. 5.CIRAD, UMR 113 CIRAD/INRA/IRD/SUP-AGRO/UM2Laboratoire des Symbioses Tropicales et Méditerranéennes (LSTM)MontpellierFrance
  6. 6.Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie EvolutiveUniversité de Lyon, F-69000, Lyon ; Université Lyon 1 ; CNRS, UMR5558VilleurbanneFrance
  7. 7.IRD, UMR 113 CIRAD/INRA/IRD/SUP-AGRO/UM2Laboratoire des Symbioses Tropicales et Méditerranéennes (LSTM)MontpellierFrance