Photosynthetica

, Volume 51, Issue 2, pp 163–190

Photosynthesis under stressful environments: An overview

Review

DOI: 10.1007/s11099-013-0021-6

Cite this article as:
Ashraf, M. & Harris, P.J.C. Photosynthetica (2013) 51: 163. doi:10.1007/s11099-013-0021-6

Abstract

Stressful environments such as salinity, drought, and high temperature (heat) cause alterations in a wide range of physiological, biochemical, and molecular processes in plants. Photosynthesis, the most fundamental and intricate physiological process in all green plants, is also severely affected in all its phases by such stresses. Since the mechanism of photosynthesis involves various components, including photosynthetic pigments and photosystems, the electron transport system, and CO2 reduction pathways, any damage at any level caused by a stress may reduce the overall photosynthetic capacity of a green plant. Details of the stress-induced damage and adverse effects on different types of pigments, photosystems, components of electron transport system, alterations in the activities of enzymes involved in the mechanism of photosynthesis, and changes in various gas exchange characteristics, particularly of agricultural plants, are considered in this review. In addition, we discussed also progress made during the last two decades in producing transgenic lines of different C3 crops with enhanced photosynthetic performance, which was reached by either the overexpression of C3 enzymes or transcription factors or the incorporation of genes encoding C4 enzymes into C3 plants. We also discussed critically a current, worldwide effort to identify signaling components, such as transcription factors and protein kinases, particularly mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) involved in stress adaptation in agricultural plants.

Additional key words

droughtfluorescencegas exchangeheatphotosynthesisphotosynthetic pigmentssalinity, salinity stress

Abbreviations

ABA

abscisic acid

ALA

5-aminolevulinic acid

Car

carotenoids

Chl

chlorophyll

Fi

the fluorescence at transient inflection level

Fo

the minimal fluorescence

Fm

the maximal fluorescence

Fp

the fluorescence at peak level

Fv

the variable fluorescence

gs

stomatal conductance

LHC

light harvesting complex

MAPKs

mitogen-activated protein kinases

NADPH

reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate

NADP-ME

NADP-malic enzyme

OEC

oxygen evolving complex

qN or NPQ

nonphotochemical quenching

Pchlide

protochlorophyllide

PEPC

phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase

PN

net photosynthetic rate

PPDK

phosphopyruvate dikinase

PSII

photosystem II

qP

photochemical quenching

RWC

relative water content

Rubisco

ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

RUBP

ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate

WUE

water-use efficiency

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of AgricultureFaisalabadPakistan
  2. 2.Centre for Agroecology and Food SecurityCoventry UniversityCoventryUK