Pharmaceutical Research

, Volume 31, Issue 6, pp 1525–1535

Comparison of In Vitro Deposition of Pharmaceutical Aerosols in an Idealized Child Throat with In Vivo Deposition in the Upper Respiratory Tract of Children

Authors

  • Conor A. Ruzycki
    • Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Alberta
  • Laleh Golshahi
    • Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Alberta
    • Department of PharmaceuticsVirginia Commonwealth University
  • Reinhard Vehring
    • Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Alberta
    • Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Alberta
Research Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11095-013-1258-2

Cite this article as:
Ruzycki, C.A., Golshahi, L., Vehring, R. et al. Pharm Res (2014) 31: 1525. doi:10.1007/s11095-013-1258-2

Abstract

Purpose

Deposition of drug emitted from two commercially available inhalers was measured in an in vitro child oral airway model and compared to existing in vivo data to examine the ability of the child model to replicate in vivo deposition.

Methods

In vitro deposition of drug from a QVAR® pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI) and Pulmicort® Turbuhaler® dry powder inhaler (DPI) in an Idealized Child Throat (1) and downstream filter was measured using UV spectroscopy and simulated realistic breathing profiles. Potential effects of ambient relative humidity ranging from 10% to 90% on deposition were also considered.

Results

In vitro QVAR pMDI deposition in the idealized mouth-throat at 50% RH (39.2 ± 2.3% of delivered dose) compared well (p > 0.05) with in vivo extrathoracic deposition in asthmatic children age 8 to 14 (45.8 ± 12.3%). In vitro Turbuhaler DPI deposition in the idealized mouth-throat at 50% RH (69.0 ± 1.5%) matched in vivo extrathoracic deposition (p > 0.05) in 6 to 16 year old children with cystic fibrosis (70.4 ± 21.2%). The effects of ambient humidity were found to be insignificant for Turbuhaler and minor for QVAR.

Conclusions

The Idealized Child Throat successfully mimics in vivo deposition data in school age children for the inhalers tested, and may provide a standard platform for optimizing pediatric treatment with inhaled pharmaceutical aerosols.

KEY WORDS

extrathoracic airwayslung deliverypediatricQVAR pressurized metered dose inhalerturbuhaler dry powder inhaler

Abbreviations

DPI

Dry powder inhaler

MMAD

Mass median aerodynamic diameter

pMDI

Pressurized metered dose inhaler

RH

Relative humidity

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014