Natural Hazards

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 413–428

Examining the relationship between wetland alteration and watershed flooding in Texas and Florida

Authors

    • Environmental Planning & Sustainability Research Unit, Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center, Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban PlanningTexas A&M University
  • Wesley E. Highfield
    • Environmental Planning & Sustainability Research Unit, Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center, Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban PlanningTexas A&M University
  • Hyung-Cheal Ryu
    • Environmental Planning & Sustainability Research Unit, Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center, Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban PlanningTexas A&M University
  • Laura Spanel-Weber
    • Environmental Planning & Sustainability Research Unit, Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center, Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban PlanningTexas A&M University
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s11069-006-9003-3

Cite this article as:
Brody, S.D., Highfield, W.E., Ryu, H. et al. Nat Hazards (2007) 40: 413. doi:10.1007/s11069-006-9003-3

Abstract

Inland flooding remains one of the greatest threats to the safety of human population in the United States (US). While few large-scale studies exist, the potential role of naturally occurring wetlands in mitigating flood duration and intensity has been widely discussed. This study examines the relationship between wetland alteration and coastal watershed flooding in Texas and Florida over a 12-year period. Specifically, we geo-reference wetland alteration permits required under Section 404 of the US Clean Water Act and correlate the number of granted permits with the degree of flooding measured by stream gauge data. Results indicate that specific types of federal permits exacerbate flooding events in coastal watersheds while controlling for various environmental and socioeconomic characteristics.

Keywords

FloodingWetlandsWatershedPlanningTexasFlorida

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006