Neurochemical Research

, Volume 36, Issue 5, pp 783–792

Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Schwann-Like Cell Transplantation Combined with Neurotrophin-3 Administration in Dyskinesia of Rats with Spinal Cord Injury

  • Guo Yan-Wu
  • Ke Yi-Quan
  • Li Ming
  • Cai Ying-Qian
  • Jiang Xiao-Dan
  • Zhang Shi-Zhong
  • Zhang Wang-Ming
  • Duan Chuan-Zhi
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11064-011-0402-9

Cite this article as:
Yan-Wu, G., Yi-Quan, K., Ming, L. et al. Neurochem Res (2011) 36: 783. doi:10.1007/s11064-011-0402-9

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells are capable of differentiating into Schwann-like cells. In this study, we induced human umbilical-cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) in vitro into neurospheres constituted by neural stem-like cells, and further into cells bearing strong morphological, phenotypic and functional resemblances with Schwann-like cells. These HUMSC-derived Schwann-like cells, after grafting into the injured area of the rats’ spinal cord injury (SCI), showed a partial therapeutic effect in terms of improving the motor function. Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) was reported to improve the local microenvironment of the grafted cells, and we, therefore, further tested the effect of Schwann-like cell grafting combined with NT-3 administration at the site of cell transplantation. The results showed that NT-3 administration significantly promoted the survival of the grafted cells in the host-injured area. Significant improvement in rats treated by Schwann-like cell grafting combined with NT-3 administration was demonstrated in the behavioral test as compared with that in animal models received the cell grafting only. These results suggest that transplantation of the Schwann-like cells combined with NT-3 administration may represent a new strategy of stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury.

Keywords

Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cellsSchwann-like cellsCell differentiationCell transplantationSpinal cord injury

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guo Yan-Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ke Yi-Quan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Li Ming
    • 1
    • 2
  • Cai Ying-Qian
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jiang Xiao-Dan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhang Shi-Zhong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhang Wang-Ming
    • 1
    • 2
  • Duan Chuan-Zhi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, Zhujiang HospitalSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Institute of Neurosurgery, Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration of GuangdongSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina