Clinical Study

Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 114, Issue 3, pp 299-307

First online:

Trends in intracranial meningioma surgery and outcome: a Nationwide Inpatient Sample database analysis from 2001 to 2010

  • Sudheer AmbekarAffiliated withDepartment of Neurosurgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
  • , Mayur SharmaAffiliated withDepartment of Neurosurgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
  • , Venkatesh S. MadhugiriAffiliated withDepartment of Neurosurgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
  • , Anil NandaAffiliated withDepartment of Neurosurgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Email author 

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to analyze the risk of in-patient mortality, adverse outcome, practice patterns and regional variations in patients who underwent intracranial meningioma surgery in the United States between 2001 and 2010. We performed a retrospective cohort study using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. In-patient mortality and adverse outcome at discharge were the outcome predictors. Multivariate analyses were done to analyze the patient, hospital and physician characteristics. The annual case-volume of patients with meningioma increased from 2001 to 2010 by 40 %. The in-patient mortality rate remained the same at 1.3 % and the rate of adverse discharge disposition remained at 35 % between 2001 and 2010. Caucasian female patients in younger age group with private insurance who underwent treatment at a high case-volume center had the best outcomes. In older patients (≥70 years), the in-patient mortality rate decreased by 25 % whereas the adverse discharge disposition rate increased by 19 %. Patients treated at high case-volume centers and by high case-volume physicians had lower rates of in-patient mortality (P < 0.05) and adverse outcome at discharge (P = 0 < 0.05). There was a 54 % decrease in the number of hospitals performing one surgery/year through the decade. A 2 % relative decrease in mortality was observed in lowest volume hospitals. Though the highest increase in admission charges through the decade was seen in hospitals located in the north-east (165 % relative increase), the highest relative decrease in mortality and morbidity was observed in hospitals located in the mid-west and the south (67.6  and 22 % respectively).

Keywords

Meningioma Trends Nationwide Inpatient Sample Mortality Morbidity