Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 107, Issue 2, pp 247–256

Growth inhibition of malignant glioblastoma by DING protein

  • Markus J. Bookland
  • Nune Darbinian
  • Michael Weaver
  • Shohreh Amini
  • Kamel Khalili
Laboratory Investigation - Human/Animal Tissue

DOI: 10.1007/s11060-011-0743-x

Cite this article as:
Bookland, M.J., Darbinian, N., Weaver, M. et al. J Neurooncol (2012) 107: 247. doi:10.1007/s11060-011-0743-x

Abstract

Malignant gliomas are a highly aggressive type of brain tumor with extremely poor prognosis. These tumors are highly invasive and are often surgically incurable and resistant to chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy. Thus, novel therapies that target pathways involved in growth and survival of the tumor cells are required for the treatment of this class of brain tumors. Previous studies revealed that epidermal growth factor receptor and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), which are involved in the induction of cell proliferation, are activated in the most aggressive type of glioma, i.e. glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In fact, GBMs with increased levels of ERK activity exhibit a more aggressive phenotype than the others with moderate ERK activity, pointing to the importance of ERK and its kinase activity in the development and progression of these tumors. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of p38SJ, a novel member of the DING family of proteins, derived from Hypericum perforatum calluses, on the growth of malignant glioma cell lines, T98G and U-87MG by focusing on cell cycle and signaling pathways controlled by phosphorylation of various regulatory proteins including ERK. p38SJ, which exhibits profound phosphatase activity, shows the capacity to affect the phosphorylation status of several important kinases modulating signaling pathways, and cell growth and proliferation. Our results demonstrate that p38SJ reduces glioma cell viability and arrests cell cycle progression at G0/G1. The observed growth inhibitory effect of p38SJ is likely mediated by the downregulation of several cell cycle gatekeeper proteins, including cyclin E, Cdc2, and E2F-1. These results suggest that p38SJ may serve as a potential candidate for development of a therapeutic agent for the direct treatment of malignant gliomas and/or as a potential radiosensitizer.

Keywords

p38SJDINGPhosphataseGliomaCell cycle

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Markus J. Bookland
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nune Darbinian
    • 1
  • Michael Weaver
    • 2
  • Shohreh Amini
    • 1
    • 3
  • Kamel Khalili
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neuroscience, Center for NeurovirologyTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biology, College of Science and TechnologyTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA