Journal of Nanoparticle Research

, 14:970

Limitations and information needs for engineered nanomaterial-specific exposure estimation and scenarios: recommendations for improved reporting practices

  • Katherine Clark
  • Martie van Tongeren
  • Frans M. Christensen
  • Derk Brouwer
  • Bernd Nowack
  • Fadri Gottschalk
  • Christian Micheletti
  • Kaspar Schmid
  • Rianda Gerritsen
  • Rob Aitken
  • Celina Vaquero
  • Vasileios Gkanis
  • Christos Housiadas
  • Jesús María López de Ipiña
  • Michael Riediker
Research Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11051-012-0970-x

Cite this article as:
Clark, K., van Tongeren, M., Christensen, F.M. et al. J Nanopart Res (2012) 14: 970. doi:10.1007/s11051-012-0970-x
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Nanotechnology, Occupational and Environmental Health

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to describe the process and challenges in building exposure scenarios for engineered nanomaterials (ENM), using an exposure scenario format similar to that used for the European Chemicals regulation (REACH). Over 60 exposure scenarios were developed based on information from publicly available sources (literature, books, and reports), publicly available exposure estimation models, occupational sampling campaign data from partnering institutions, and industrial partners regarding their own facilities. The primary focus was on carbon-based nanomaterials, nano-silver (nano-Ag) and nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2), and included occupational and consumer uses of these materials with consideration of the associated environmental release. The process of building exposure scenarios illustrated the availability and limitations of existing information and exposure assessment tools for characterizing exposure to ENM, particularly as it relates to risk assessment. This article describes the gaps in the information reviewed, recommends future areas of ENM exposure research, and proposes types of information that should, at a minimum, be included when reporting the results of such research, so that the information is useful in a wider context.

Keywords

NanomaterialsExposure assessmentRisk assessmentModelingREACHEnvironmental and health effects

Supplementary material

11051_2012_970_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (223 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 222 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine Clark
    • 1
    • 8
  • Martie van Tongeren
    • 2
  • Frans M. Christensen
    • 3
    • 9
  • Derk Brouwer
    • 4
  • Bernd Nowack
    • 5
  • Fadri Gottschalk
    • 5
  • Christian Micheletti
    • 3
    • 10
  • Kaspar Schmid
    • 2
  • Rianda Gerritsen
    • 4
  • Rob Aitken
    • 2
  • Celina Vaquero
    • 6
  • Vasileios Gkanis
    • 7
  • Christos Housiadas
    • 7
  • Jesús María López de Ipiña
    • 6
  • Michael Riediker
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Work and Health (IST)LausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM)EdinburghScotland, UK
  3. 3.Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), Joint Research Centre (JRC)IspraItaly
  4. 4.TNOZeistThe Netherlands
  5. 5.EMPA–Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and TechnologySt. GallenSwitzerland
  6. 6.TECNALIA Research and InnovationMinanoSpain
  7. 7.National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos”AthensGreece
  8. 8.LKCFullinsdorfSwitzerland
  9. 9.COWIKongens LyngbyDenmark
  10. 10.Veneto NanoTech S.C.p.APadovaItaly