, Volume 10, Issue 6, pp 825-835
Date: 24 Oct 2005

Scheduling Sleeping Nodes in High Density Cluster-based Sensor Networks

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Abstract

In order to conserve battery power in very dense sensor networks, some sensor nodes may be put into the sleep state while other sensor nodes remain active for the sensing and communication tasks. In this paper, we study the node sleep scheduling problem in the context of clustered sensor networks. We propose and analyze the Linear Distance-based Scheduling (LDS) technique for sleeping in each cluster. The LDS scheme selects a sensor node to sleep with higher probability when it is farther away from the cluster head. We analyze the energy consumption, the sensing coverage property, and the network lifetime of the proposed LDS scheme. The performance of the LDS scheme is compared with that of the conventional Randomized Scheduling (RS) scheme. It is shown that the LDS scheme yields more energy savings while maintaining a similar sensing coverage as the RS scheme for sensor clusters. Therefore, the LDS scheme results in a longer network lifetime than the RS scheme.

Jing Deng received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in Electronic Engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, P. R. China, in 1994 and 1997, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, in 2002. Dr. Deng is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of New Orleans. From 2002 to 2004, he visited the CASE center and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY as a research assistant professor, supported by the Syracuse University Prototypical Research in Information Assurance (SUPRIA) program. He was a teaching assistant from 1998 to 1999 and a research assistant from 1999 to 2002 in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University. His interests include mobile ad hoc networks, wireless sensor networks, wireless network security, energy efficient wireless networks, and information assurance.
Wendi B. Heinzelman is an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Rochester. She received a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University in 1995 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 1997 and 2000 respectively. Her current research interests lie in the areas of wireless communications and networking, mobile computing, and multimedia communication. Dr. Heinzelman received the NSF Career award in 2005 for her work on cross-layer optimizations for wireless sensor networks, and she received the ONR Young Investigator award in 2005 for her research on balancing resource utilization in wireless sensor networks. Dr. Heinzelman was co-chair of the 1st Workshop on Broadband Advanced Sensor Networks (BaseNets '04), and she is a member of Sigma Xi, the IEEE, and the ACM.
Yunghsiang S. Han was born in Taipei, Taiwan, on April 24, 1962. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, in 1984 and 1986, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from the School of Computer and Information Science, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, in 1993. From 1986 to 1988 he was a lecturer at Ming-Hsin Engineering College, Hsinchu, Taiwan. He was a teaching assistant from 1989 to 1992 and from 1992 to 1993 a research associate in the School of Computer and Information Science, Syracuse University. From 1993 to 1997 he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Electronic Engineering at Hua Fan College of Humanities and Technology, Taipei Hsien, Taiwan. From 1997 to 2004 he was with the Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering at National Chi Nan University, Nantou, Taiwan. He was promoted to Full Professor in 1998. From June to October 2001 he was a visiting scholar in the Department of Electrical Engineering at University of Hawaii at Manoa, HI, and from September 2002 to January 2004 he was the SUPRIA visiting research scholar in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and CASE center at Syracuse University, NY. He is now with the Graduate Institute of Communication Engineering at National Taipei University, Taipei, Taiwan. His research interests are in wireless networks, security, and error-control coding. Dr. Han is a winner of 1994 Syracuse University Doctoral Prize.
Pramod K. Varshney was born in Allahabad, India on July 1, 1952. He received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering and computer science (with highest honors), and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1972, 1974, and 1976 respectively. Since 1976 he has been with Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY where he is currently a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Research Director of the New York State Center for Advanced Technology in Computer Applications and Software Engineering. His current research interests are in distributed sensor networks and data fusion, detection and estimation theory, wireless communications, intelligent systems, signal and image processing, and remote sensing he has published extensively. He is the author of Distributed Detection and Data Fusion, published by Springer-Verlag in 1997 and has co-edited two other books. Dr. Varshney is a member of Tau Beta Pi and is the recipient of the 1981 ASEE Dow Outstanding Young Faculty Award. He was elected to the grade of Fellow of the IEEE in 1997 for his contributions in the area of distributed detection and data fusion. In 2000, he received the Third Millennium Medal from the IEEE and Chancellor's Citation for exceptional academic achievement at Syracuse University. He serves as a distinguished lecturer for the AES society of the IEEE. He is on the editorial board Information Fusion. He was the President of International Society of Information Fusion during 2001.