Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 39, Issue 12, pp 11137–11144

A functional polymorphism, rs28493229, in ITPKC and risk of Kawasaki disease: an integrated meta-analysis

  • Jiao Lou
  • Sanqing Xu
  • Li Zou
  • Rong Zhong
  • Ti Zhang
  • Yu Sun
  • Xuzai Lu
  • Li Liu
  • Chuanqi Li
  • Li Wang
  • Guanglian Xiong
  • Wei Wang
  • Fangqi Gong
  • Jing Wu
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11033-012-2022-0

Cite this article as:
Lou, J., Xu, S., Zou, L. et al. Mol Biol Rep (2012) 39: 11137. doi:10.1007/s11033-012-2022-0

Abstract

Kawasaki disease (KD) is a multi-systemic vasculitis which preferentially affects infants and children. A single nucleotide polymorphism (rs28493229) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase C (ITPKC) was identified to be associated with the increased risk of KD; however, in more recent studies associations have been controversial. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis, integrating case–control and transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) studies, to investigate the relationship between this polymorphism and risk of KD. A total of ten case–control and two TDT studies, comprising 3,821 cases, 12,802 controls and 949 families, were included in this meta-analysis. There was a significant association between the C allele of rs28493229 and the increased risk of KD (OR = 1.53, 95 % CI = 1.34−1.74, P < 0.001), by the random-effects model because of heterogeneity (Q = 27.67, Pheterogeneity = 0.004). Nevertheless, it was screened out by meta-regression analysis that the coronary artery lesions (CALs) status of KD could partly explain the heterogeneity, with consistently significant associations in both subgroups after stratification by CALs status. Moreover, estimates before and after the deletion of each study were similar in sensitivity analysis, indicating robust stability of the meta-analysis. This meta-analysis reveals that the functional polymorphism rs28493229 in ITPKC significantly contributes to the risk of KD.

Keywords

Polymorphismrs28493229ITPKCKawasaki diseaseIntegrated meta-analysis

Supplementary material

11033_2012_2022_MOESM1_ESM.docx (43 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 43 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiao Lou
    • 1
  • Sanqing Xu
    • 2
  • Li Zou
    • 1
  • Rong Zhong
    • 1
  • Ti Zhang
    • 1
  • Yu Sun
    • 1
  • Xuzai Lu
    • 1
  • Li Liu
    • 3
  • Chuanqi Li
    • 4
  • Li Wang
    • 5
  • Guanglian Xiong
    • 1
  • Wei Wang
    • 6
  • Fangqi Gong
    • 6
  • Jing Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and MOE Key Lab of Environment and HealthSchool of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsTongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsSchool of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical UniversityGuangzhouChina
  4. 4.School of Medicine and Health ManagementTongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  5. 5.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsInstitute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical CollegeBeijingChina
  6. 6.Department of CardiologyChildren’s Hospital, Zhejiang University School of MedicineHangzhouChina