, Volume 38, Issue 5, pp 2879-2885
Date: 23 Jan 2010

Lubricin: a novel potential biotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of osteoarthritis

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Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multi-factor disorder of sinovial joints, which characterized by escalated degeneration and loss of articular cartilage. Treatment of OA is a critical unmet need in medicine for regeneration of damaged articular cartilage in elderly. On the other hand, lubricin, a glycoprotein specifically synthesized by chondrocytes located at the surface of articular cartilage, has been shown to provide boundary lubrication of congruent articular surfaces under conditions of high contact pressure and near zero sliding speed. Lubrication of these surfaces is critical to normal joint function, while different gene expressions of lubricin had been found in the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and OA. Moreover, mutations or lacking of lubricin gene have been shown to link to the joint disease such as camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP), synovial hyperplasia and failure of joint function, suggesting an important role of lubricin in the pathogenesis of these joint disease. Recent studies demonstrate that administration with recombinant lubricin in the joint cavity would be effective in the prevention of cartilage degeneration in animal OA models. Therefore, a treatment with lubricin which would protect cartilage in vivo would be desirable. This article reviews recent findings with regard to the possible role of lubricin in the progression of OA, and further discusses lubricin as a novel potential biotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of OA.