Molecular Breeding

, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 269–277

The salt-tolerance gene rstB can be used as a selectable marker in plant genetic transformation

Authors

  • Wan-Jun Zhang
    • State Key Laboratory for Agro-biotechnologyChina Agricultural University
    • Plant Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory, Agriculture and food SystemUniversity of Melbourne
  • Su-Sheng Yang
    • Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyChina Agricultural University
  • Xiao-Ye Shen
    • State Key Laboratory for Agro-biotechnologyChina Agricultural University
  • Yong-Sheng Jin
    • State Key Laboratory for Agro-biotechnologyChina Agricultural University
  • Hui-Jun Zhao
    • State Key Laboratory for Agro-biotechnologyChina Agricultural University
    • State Key Laboratory for Agro-biotechnologyChina Agricultural University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11032-008-9231-1

Cite this article as:
Zhang, W., Yang, S., Shen, X. et al. Mol Breeding (2009) 23: 269. doi:10.1007/s11032-008-9231-1

Abstract

The salt-tolerance gene rstB under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter was used as a selectable marker gene in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi). The selective agent for plant regeneration was tolerance to 170 mM sodium chloride. The highest selection efficiency was 83.3%. No obvious differences in selection efficiencies were observed when those obtained using the standard selectable marker gene hpt and a selection regime of 10 mg l−1 hygromycin. Transgenic events were confirmed by PCR, Southern blot, RT-PCR and green fluorescent protein studies. The rstB transgenic plants showed improved salt tolerance and a normal phenotype. Based on these results, we suggest that the rstB gene may be used as a promising selectable marker and an alternative to the antibiotic- or herbicide-resistance genes in plant transformation.

Keywords

NaCl Plant transformation Salt tolerance Selectable marker Selection reagent

Supplementary material

11032_2008_9231_MOESM1_ESM.docx (2.4 mb)
Supplementary figures (DOCX 2497 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008