Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

, Volume 328, Issue 1, pp 177–182

Changes in gene expression of kringle domain-containing proteins in murine brains and neuroblastoma cells infected by prions

  • Younghwan Kim
  • Jihyun Song
  • Charles E. Mays
  • William Titlow
  • Donghoon Yoon
  • Chongsuk Ryou
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11010-009-0087-4

Cite this article as:
Kim, Y., Song, J., Mays, C.E. et al. Mol Cell Biochem (2009) 328: 177. doi:10.1007/s11010-009-0087-4

Abstract

Prion protein (PrP) interacts with some kringle domain-containing proteins. Kringle domains serve as binding domains in the interaction with PrP. The structural conservation among kringle domains leads to the hypothesis that any protein containing these domains can interact with PrP and be involved in prion pathogenesis. Because prion pathogenesis occurs in the brain, kringle domain-containing proteins should be available in the same tissue if they are relevant to prion pathogenesis. However, gene expression of these proteins in brains infected by prions has not been examined. Here, we showed that plasminogen (plg), urokinase type plasminogen activator (upa), tissue type plasminogen activator (tpa), prothrombin (prothr), and hepatocyte growth factor (hgf) genes were expressed in murine brains and neuroblastoma cells. The changes in upa, prothr, and hgf gene expression correlated with prion disease, but those in plg and tpa gene expression did not. Our data suggest association of gene expression of kringle domain-containing proteins in brains with prion disease.

Keywords

Prion diseaseGene expressionPlasminogenPlasminogen activatorsProthrombinHepatocyte growth factor

Supplementary material

11010_2009_87_MOESM1_ESM.tif (41.8 mb)
(TIFF 42758 kb)Fig. S1. Changes of ΔCT in gene expression of kringle domain-containing proteins in prion-infected and -free mouse brains. The data were presented in terms of ΔCT (the difference of CT). Differential expression was measured by subtracting CT values of actin control from those of kringle domain-containing protein genes. The P values were obtained by Student’s t-test. The asterisk denotes P < 0.05

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Younghwan Kim
    • 1
  • Jihyun Song
    • 2
  • Charles E. Mays
    • 1
  • William Titlow
    • 1
  • Donghoon Yoon
    • 2
  • Chongsuk Ryou
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Genetics, Sanders Brown Center on AgingUniversity of Kentucky College of MedicineLexingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medicine, Hematology DivisionUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA