, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 544-553
Date: 19 Apr 2013

Reported Experiences with Medicaid Managed Care Models Among Parents of Children

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Abstract

The proportion of children enrolled in Medicaid managed care arrangements has grown significantly over the past decade. Yet, few studies have attempted to assess differences in parental reports and ratings of care for children enrolled in different types of Medicaid managed care. We examine parental reports and ratings of care to explore whether and how patient and parent experiences vary by child health status and managed care plan type, including provider-sponsored specialized plans serving only children. Parents of children in a Florida Medicaid demonstration project in two counties over 3 years were surveyed using Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems surveys (n = 2,741–11,067). Ordered logistic regression models with interaction terms were used to assess relationships between plan type, presence of chronic condition, and measures of patient experience. Parents of children enrolled in provider-sponsored plans that focus on pediatrics were more likely to provide a positive rating for their doctor, health plan, and specialty care compared to parents of children in an health maintenance organization (HMO). Parents of children with a chronic condition were less likely than parents of children without a chronic condition to provide a favorable rating of overall health care, their doctor, or health plan. The interaction term that assessed whether patient experience by plan type was impacted by the child’s health status was not statistically significant. Parents of Medicaid children may prefer provider-sponsored arrangements over HMOs. Findings can inform the future development of other integrated models of care involving provider-sponsored arrangements, such as pediatric Accountable Care Organizations and Patient-Centered Medical Homes.