, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 159-163

Paternal Influences on the Timing of Prenatal Care Among Hispanics

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Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the independent role of paternal influences on the onset of prenatal care among Hispanic women. Methods: A total of 300 pregnant Hispanic women seeking prenatal care on or before their 35th week of gestation were surveyed about their and their partner’s pregnancy intention. Women in this study were recruited from clinics providing services to low income and medically indigent women. Results: Father’s pregnancy intention had a protective effect on the timely onset of prenatal care. Pregnancies that were unintended by the mother but were intended by the father had a lower likelihood of delayed care, as compared to those unintended by both (Odds Ratio [OR] = .54, 95% confidence interval [CI] = .28, .99). This trend was stronger among married than non-married couples. Conclusion: Comprehensive efforts are needed to involve male partners in family planning as well as in programs aimed at expanding adequate pre- and postnatal behaviors within Hispanics.