Maternal and Child Health Journal

, 10:293

Methamphetamine and Other Substance Use During Pregnancy: Preliminary Estimates From the Infant Development, Environment, and Lifestyle (IDEAL) Study

  • Amelia M. Arria
  • Chris Derauf
  • Linda L. LaGasse
  • Penny Grant
  • Rizwan Shah
  • Lynne Smith
  • William Haning
  • Marilyn Huestis
  • Arthur Strauss
  • Sheri Della Grotta
  • Jing Liu
  • Barry Lester
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10995-005-0052-0

Cite this article as:
Arria, A.M., Derauf, C., LaGasse, L.L. et al. Matern Child Health J (2006) 10: 293. doi:10.1007/s10995-005-0052-0

Objectives: Methamphetamine use is a continuing problem in several regions of the United States and yet few studies have focused on prenatal methamphetamine exposure. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of alcohol, tobacco, and other substance use—including methamphetamine—during pregnancy. Methods: The sample consisted of the first 1632 eligible mothers who consented to participate in a large-scale multisite study focused on prenatal methamphetamine exposure. This unselected screening sample included both users and nonusers of alcohol, tobacco, methamphetamine, and other drugs. Substance use was determined by maternal self-report and/or GC/MS confirmation of a positive meconium screen. Results: Overall, 5.2% of women used methamphetamine at some point during their pregnancy. One quarter of the sample smoked tobacco, 22.8% drank alcohol, 6.0% used marijuana, and 1.3% used barbiturates prenatally. Less than 1% of the sample used heroin, benzodiazapenes, and hallucinogens. Multivariate modeling results showed that tobacco smokers and illicit drug users were more likely to be single and less educated, have attended less than 11 prenatal visits, and utilize public financial assistance. Conclusions: This is the first large-scale investigation to report the prevalence of methamphetamine use during pregnancy in areas of the United States where methamphetamine is a notable concern. Follow-up research is ongoing to investigate the outcomes associated with prenatal methamphetamine exposure. Given that this research extends and confirms previous findings showing that high-risk groups of pregnant women can be identified on the basis of basic demographic characteristics, targeted interventions are greatly needed to reduce serious adverse outcomes associated with prenatal alcohol and tobacco use.

KEY WORDS:

methamphetaminepregnancyalcohol and other drug useprenatal careepidemiology

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amelia M. Arria
    • 1
    • 11
  • Chris Derauf
    • 2
  • Linda L. LaGasse
    • 3
  • Penny Grant
    • 4
  • Rizwan Shah
    • 5
  • Lynne Smith
    • 6
  • William Haning
    • 7
  • Marilyn Huestis
    • 8
  • Arthur Strauss
    • 9
  • Sheri Della Grotta
    • 3
  • Jing Liu
    • 3
  • Barry Lester
    • 10
  1. 1.Center for Substance Abuse ResearchUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of MedicineHonoluluUSA
  3. 3.Infant Development CenterWomen and Infants’ HospitalProvidenceUSA
  4. 4.University of Oklahoma College of MedicineTulsaUSA
  5. 5.Blank Children's HospitalDes MoinesUSA
  6. 6.Harbor-UCLA Medical CenterTorranceUSA
  7. 7.University of HawaiiJohn A. Burns School of MedicineHonoluluUSA
  8. 8.Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics BranchIntramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug AbuseBaltimoreUSA
  9. 9.Long Beach Memorial Medical CenterLong BeachUSA
  10. 10.Infant Development CenterWomen and Infants’ Hospital, and Brown Medical SchoolProvidenceUSA
  11. 11.Center for Substance Abuse ResearchUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA