Linguistics and Philosophy

, Volume 32, Issue 4, pp 327–352

Judgment ascriptions

Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10988-009-9063-4

Cite this article as:
Sæbø, K.J. Linguist and Philos (2009) 32: 327. doi:10.1007/s10988-009-9063-4

Abstract

Some propositional attitude verbs require that the complement contain some “subjective predicate”. In terms of the theory proposed by Lasersohn, these verbs would seem to identify the “judge” of the embedded proposition with the matrix subject, and there have been suggestions in this direction. I show that it is possible to analyze these verbs as setting the judge and doing nothing more; then according to whether a judge index or a judge argument is assumed, unless the complement contains a subjective predicate, the whole matrix is redundant or there is a type conflict. I further show that certain clear facts argue for assuming a judge argument which can be filled by a contextually salient entity–or by the subject of a subjective attitude verb.

Keywords

JudgmentPropositional attitudesSubjective predicatesPersonal taste

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of OsloOsloNorway