Landscape Ecology

, Volume 31, Issue 7, pp 1629–1641

Butterfly dispersal in farmland: a replicated landscape genetics study on the meadow brown butterfly (Maniola jurtina)

  • Anne Villemey
  • William E. Peterman
  • Murielle Richard
  • Annie Ouin
  • Inge van Halder
  • Virginie M. Stevens
  • Michel Baguette
  • Philip Roche
  • Frédéric Archaux
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10980-016-0348-z

Cite this article as:
Villemey, A., Peterman, W.E., Richard, M. et al. Landscape Ecol (2016) 31: 1629. doi:10.1007/s10980-016-0348-z
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Abstract

Context

Anthropogenic activities readily result in the fragmentation of habitats such that species persistence increasingly depends on their ability to disperse. However, landscape features that enhance or limit individual dispersal are often poorly understood. Landscape genetics has recently provided innovative solutions to evaluate landscape resistance to dispersal.

Objectives

We studied the dispersal of the common meadow brown butterfly, Maniola jurtina, in agricultural landscapes, using a replicated study design and rigorous statistical analyses. Based on existing behavioral and life history research, we hypothesized that the meadow brown would preferentially disperse through its preferred grassy habitats (meadows and road verges) and avoid dispersing through woodlands and the agricultural matrix.

Methods

Samples were collected in 18 study landscapes of 5 × 5 km in three contrasting agricultural French regions. Using circuit theory, least cost path and transect-based methods, we analyzed the effect of the landscape on gene flow separately for each sex.

Results

Analysis of 1681 samples with 6 microsatellites loci revealed that landscape features weakly influence meadow brown butterfly gene flow. Gene flow in both sexes appeared to be weakly limited by forests and arable lands, whereas grasslands and grassy linear elements (road verges) were more likely to enhance gene flow.

Conclusion

Our results are consistent with the hypothesis of greater dispersal through landscape elements that are most similar to suitable habitat. Our spatially replicated landscape genetics study allowed us to detect subtle landscape effects on butterfly gene flow, and these findings were reinforced by consistent results across analytical methods.

Keywords

Agricultural landscape Gene flow Landscape resistance Lepidoptera Linear mixed-effect model Movement Spatial replication 

Supplementary material

10980_2016_348_MOESM1_ESM.docx (35 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 36 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne Villemey
    • 1
  • William E. Peterman
    • 2
  • Murielle Richard
    • 3
  • Annie Ouin
    • 4
    • 5
  • Inge van Halder
    • 6
    • 7
  • Virginie M. Stevens
    • 3
  • Michel Baguette
    • 3
    • 8
  • Philip Roche
    • 9
  • Frédéric Archaux
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut National de Recherche en Sciences et Techniques pour l’Environnement et l’Agriculture, UR EFNONogent-sur-VernissonFrance
  2. 2.School of Environment and Natural ResourcesThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  3. 3.Station d’Ecologie Théorique et Expérimentale, CNRS, UPSMoulisFrance
  4. 4.INRA Toulouse, UMR DYNAFORCastanet TolosanFrance
  5. 5.INP-ENSAT, UMR DYNAFORUniversity of ToulouseCastanet TolosanFrance
  6. 6.INRA, UMR 1202 BIOGECOCestasFrance
  7. 7.UMR 1202 BIOGECOUniversity of BordeauxPessacFrance
  8. 8.Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7205 Institut de Systématique, Evolution, BiodiversitéParisFrance
  9. 9.Institut National de Recherche en Sciences et Techniques pour l’Environnement et l’Agriculture, UR EMAXAix-en-Provence Cedex 5France

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