, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 163-164

Strategies for conserving plants through (re) introduction

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Gardeners know how hard it is to keep a plant alive and thriving in a world where everything seems to like killing plants. Restoration ecologists know the difficulties associated with restoring and maintaining diversity into degraded sites. Biogeographers understand the challenges associated with predicting how changing climates will impact the future distributions of species. Putting these together, and we see the challenge facing plant conservation in the twenty-first century. Increasing the resiliency of biodiversity by augmenting populations of rare plants with new populations planted in anticipation of changing climates is a logical process for conservation. Yet this is management strategy is characterized by limited success. Our empirical legacy of re-establishing plant populations is not strong. Our scientific justification for choosing relocation sites is plagued with high structural uncertainty. Our capacity to predict the impacts of selecting a subset of genotypes for relocat