Landscape Ecology

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 407–417

Landscape perception by forest understory birds in the Atlantic Rainforest: black-and-white versus shades of grey

Authors

    • Department of Wildlife Ecology and Management, Faculty of Forest and Environmental SciencesUniversity of Freiburg
  • Ilse Storch
    • Department of Wildlife Ecology and Management, Faculty of Forest and Environmental SciencesUniversity of Freiburg
  • Felix Knauer
    • Department of Wildlife Ecology and Management, Faculty of Forest and Environmental SciencesUniversity of Freiburg
  • Stefan Pilz
    • Statistical Consulting Unit, Department of StatisticsLudwig-Maximilians-Universität München
  • Helmut Küchenhoff
    • Statistical Consulting Unit, Department of StatisticsLudwig-Maximilians-Universität München
  • Zsolt Végvári
    • Department of Conservational ZoologyUniversity of Debrecen
  • Rafael G. Pimentel
    • Department of EcologyUniversity of São Paulo
  • Jean Paul Metzger
    • Department of EcologyUniversity of São Paulo
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10980-009-9418-9

Cite this article as:
Hansbauer, M.M., Storch, I., Knauer, F. et al. Landscape Ecol (2010) 25: 407. doi:10.1007/s10980-009-9418-9

Abstract

Even among forest specialists, species-specific responses to anthropogenic forest fragmentation may vary considerably. Some appear to be confined to forest interiors, and perceive a fragmented landscape as a mosaic of suitable fragments and hostile matrix. Others, however, are able to make use of matrix habitats and perceive the landscape in shades of grey rather than black-and-white. We analysed data of 42 Chiroxiphia caudata (Blue Manakin), 10 Pyriglena leucoptera (White-shouldered Fire-eye) and 19 Sclerurus scansor (Rufous-breasted Leaftosser) radio-tracked in the Atlantic Rainforest of Brazil between 2003 and 2005. We illustrate how habitat preferences may determine how species respond to or perceive the landscape structure. We compared available with used habitat to develop a species-specific preference index for each of six habitat classes. All three species preferred old forest, but relative use of other classes differed significantly. S. scansor perceived great contrast between old forest and matrix, whereas the other two species perceived greater habitat continuity. For conservation planning, our study offers three important messages: (1) some forest specialist species are able to persist in highly fragmented landscapes; (2) some forest species may be able to make use of different anthropogenic habitat types to various degrees; whereas (3) others are restricted to the remaining forest fragments. Our study suggests species most confined to forest interiors to be considered as potential umbrella species for landscape-scale conservation planning.

Keywords

BrazilForest fragmentationHabitat preference indexPasserinesNeotropical rainforest

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009