Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 39, Issue 9, pp 1053–1066

Violent Victimization and Perpetration During Adolescence: Developmental Stage Dependent Ecological Models

  • Jennifer L. Matjasko
  • Belinda L. Needham
  • Leslie N. Grunden
  • Amy Feldman Farb
Empirical Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10964-010-9508-7

Cite this article as:
Matjasko, J.L., Needham, B.L., Grunden, L.N. et al. J Youth Adolescence (2010) 39: 1053. doi:10.1007/s10964-010-9508-7

Abstract

Using a variant of the ecological-transactional model and developmental theories of delinquency on a nationally representative sample of adolescents, the current study explored the ecological predictors of violent victimization, perpetration, and both for three different developmental stages during adolescence. We examined the relative influence of individual and family characteristics, peers, and neighborhood characteristics on the odds of experiencing violent victimization and perpetration over time with two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health for those adolescents who reported no exposure to violence at Wave 1 (N = 8,267; 50% female; 59% Caucasian; 17% African-American; 14% Hispanic). We found that more proximal factors differentiated between different experiences with violence at Wave 2. Also, negative peers significantly differentiated between violent victimization and perpetration, and this influence was strongest in early adolescence. In exploratory analyses, we found that middle adolescents were particularly vulnerable to their disadvantaged neighborhoods for a high-risk group. This analysis is one of the few that considers multiple ecological contexts simultaneously and provides support for developmental differences within adolescence on the influence that peers and neighborhoods have in predicting violent victimization and perpetration.

Keywords

Violence Ecological Developmental 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer L. Matjasko
    • 1
  • Belinda L. Needham
    • 2
  • Leslie N. Grunden
    • 3
  • Amy Feldman Farb
    • 3
  1. 1.National Center for Injury Prevention and ControlCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  3. 3.Human Development and Family SciencesThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA